Mission

The 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson builds and maintains combat ready expeditionary forces necessary to fight and win in complex environments as members of a Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental, and Multinational (JIIM) team or as a Mission Command Element (MCE); provides first class support to Soldiers, Airmen, Civilians, and Families; and enable unified action with community, state, and interagency partners to accomplish all assigned missions.

Are you READY?

  • R: be RESPECTFUL of others

  • E: be EXPERTS

    WE NEED TO BE EXPERTS! On Oct. 3, 2009, 53 Ivy Soldiers of Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, awoke to an attack by 300 Taliban fighters on their combat outpost. The enemy had infiltrated and occupied the high ground on all four sides of the outpost. On that day, 53 Ivy Soldiers fought for their lives, they fought for each other and they fought to survive. Through coordinated efforts of the leaders and Soldiers on the ground, the resolve of AH-64 pilots from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Bostick and numerous sorties of Air Force aircraft, the team repelled the attack killing more than 150 Taliban fighters. Ivy Soldiers Staff Sgt. Clint Romesha and Staff Sgt. Ty Carter demonstrated their expertise that day. Close-quarters marksmanship, distance engagements with sniper rifles, calling for fire, and rendering aid to wounded comrades, these two NCOs helped turn the tide and prevent the outpost from being overrun.

    Like Romesha and Carter, we must be disciplined to train to master the skills of our profession. Do you want to be in a fighting position with someone that shoots 26 out of 40 or do you want a battle buddy who has trained at his or her craft to be an EXPERT, who can hit every target that they aim at as if it was second nature? We all have to work to be EXPERTS, and we all must challenge our teammates to do the same.

    EXPERTS aren't born, they're made through repetition and disciplined work. People don't become doctors or professional athletes through luck, they work to master those professions and we must do the same.

    Every Soldier should be fit, an EXPERT with their weapon and most importantly an EXPERT in their specialty. The READY Range is available Tuesday to Thursday of each week for Soldiers to continue to work on mastering the skills of marksmanship.

    Is okay good enough for you, or will you make yourself an EXPERT? Will you expect the same from your teammates, when your life may depend on their expertise? Are you an EXPERT? Are you READY?

  • A: be an ATHLETE

    WE NEED TO BE WARRIOR ATHLETES! Since 1917 Ivy Soldiers have been placed in the most demanding physical situations from the beaches of Normandy, to the sweltering jungles of Vietnam, to the mountainous terrain of the Hindu Kush, and every time they accomplished their mission. Today we are expected to move just as far and just as fast under even heavier loads to close with and destroy the enemies of our country. There’s no doubt that being a Soldier is among the most physically demanding professions and we must be READY to execute.

    Becoming a Warrior ATHLETE can’t be done overnight, and we must use every day to improve ourselves. We have to train hard, but we must also train smart and take advantage of all of the advances in fitness and nutrition we have available on Fort Carson. We are blessed to train “at altitude” — athletes from around the world pay to train here in Colorado and we get this awesome environment for free! To perform at our peak we also have to fuel our fitness with proper nutrition. Hot dogs and energy drinks are not served at the Olympic Training Center and the consequences of losing in our profession are significantly higher. The division is working to turn our dining facilities (DFACs) into Warrior Restaurants, where you can get the balanced nutrients needed to fuel peak performance. But in the end, it’s up to YOU! Strive every day to make yourself physically better with rigorous exercise and smart nutritional choices.

    Hold your teammates accountable because ultimately your life may depend on their fitness. You have a choice every day. Will you be better today than you were yesterday? Are you an ATHLETE? Are you READY?

  • D: be DISCIPLINED and enforce Army standards

  • Y: It's up to YOU. Take initiative -- make a difference and be accountable.

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Leadership

Command Group

  • Division Commander

    Biography

    Maj. Gen. Randy A. George assumed command of 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson Aug. 24, 2017.

    He enlisted in the Army in 1982 from Alden, Iowa, and was commissioned an infantry officer in 1988. His initial assignment was with 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky where he served as a platoon leader, company executive officer (Operation Desert Shield/Storm), scout platoon leader (3rd Battalion, 327th Infantry), aide-de-camp and battalion S3-Air (3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry).

    Following the Armor Officer Advance Course at Fort Knox, Kentucky, George served in 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, at Fort Carson as an assistant brigade S3 and commanded Charlie Company and Headquarters and Headquarters Company in 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry. George attended Command and General Staff College (CGSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Following CGSC, George served as the battalion executive officer for 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry and brigade executive officer for 173rd Airborne Brigade in Vicenza, Italy.

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom, George served as the deputy brigade commander for 173rd Airborne in Kirkuk, Iraq (2003-2004). He then served as the commander for the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry “Leader Rakkasans” in Bayji, Iraq (2005-2006) and as a member of the Multi-National Commander-Iraq Initiatives group in Bagdad, Iraq (2007).

    During Operation Enduring Freedom, George served as the commander of 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division (2009-2010).

    After brigade command, George served as a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City, New York, then as the chief of plans in Pakistan-Afghanistan Coordination Cell on the Joint Staff followed by an assignment as an executive officer for the vice chief of staff of the Army and CENTCOM commander at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

    George served as the deputy commanding general (Maneuver) for 4th Infantry Division at Fort Carson before assuming his duties as the director, Force Management, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 United States Army, Washington D.C. and then later as the deputy director for Regional Operations and Global Force Management (J-35), the Joint Staff.

    George earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from U.S. Military Academy, Master’s Degree in Economics from Colorado School of Mines, and a Master’s in International Security Studies from Naval War College.

    R: be RESPECTFUL of others (Live by the Golden Rule).
    E: be EXPERTS in your craft.
    A: be an ATHLETE.
    D: be DISCIPLINED and enforce Army standards.
    Y: it’s up to YOU. Take initiative- make a difference and be accountable.

  • Division Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Timothy L. Metheny became the 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson senior enlisted leader Aug. 24, 2017.

    He enlisted in the U.S. Army from Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in 1990. He completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, to become a cavalry scout.

    Metheny has served in every enlisted leadership position from team leader, squad leader, section sergeant, drill sergeant, platoon sergeant, platoon leader, first sergeant, operations sergeant major and command sergeant major.

    Metheny’s previous assignments include 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment; 5th Squadron, 12th Cavalry Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment; 3rd Battalion, 73rd Armor Regiment (Airborne); 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment (Airborne); 1st Battalion, 509th Infantry Regiment (Airborne); 5th Squadron, 15th Cavalry Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 46th Infantry Regiment; 3rd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment (Airborne); 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment (Airborne); deputy commandant of the Fort Knox Noncommissioned Officer Academy; command sergeant major of 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment; and the commandant of the Henry Caro Noncommissioned Officers Academy.

    He is a graduate of Ranger School, Pathfinder School, Bradley Fighting Vehicle Master Gunner Course, Scout Platoon Leaders Course, SERE Level B course, Airborne and Jumpmaster schools, French Commando School, Drill Sergeant School, and has completed all levels of the Noncommissioned Officers Education System.

    Metheny’s operational deployments include three Operation Iraqi Freedom rotations in Iraq and a Humanitarian Assistance Deployment to New Orleans in support of Hurricane Katrina.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star with V device, Bronze Star with one Oak Leaf Cluster, the Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Commendation Medal with V device, the Army Commendation Medal with Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Achievement Medal ninth award, the Army Good Conduct Medal seventh award, National Defense Service Medal with Bronze Star, Humanitarian Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Ribbon, Presidential Unit Citation, Meritorious Unit Citation with one Oak Leaf Cluster, Combat Action Badge, Ranger Tab, Master Parachutist Badge, Pathfinder Badge, Drill Sergeant Badge, Egyptian, British and Canadian Parachutist Badge, German Shuzenschnur (Gold) and Driver’s Badge wheeled and tracked.

    In May 2015, Metheny was selected as the Maneuver Center of Excellence and Fort Benning, Georgia, command sergeant major. In addition, Metheny has been inducted into the Order of St. George and is a member of Excellence in Armor.

  • Deputy Commanding General

    Biography

    Brig. Gen. William L. Thigpen became deputy commanding general, 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson, Aug. 4, 2017. A native of Hampton, Virginia, Thigpen graduated from Virginia State University in 1992 with a Bachelor’s degree in public administration and was commissioned as an armor officer in the U.S. Army.

    Prior to his current assignment, Thigpen served at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., as a chief of staff of the Army’s senior fellow. He has commanded United States Army formations at every level from company through brigade, and prior to his fellowship, he commanded the 316th Cavalry Brigade at Fort Benning, Georgia. He is a combat veteran of campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. His staff assignments include serving as the aide-de-camp to the vice chief of staff of the Army.

    He is a graduate of the National War College, where he earned a Master’s degree in National Security and Strategic Studies. He holds a second Master’s degree in Business from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

  • Deputy Commanding General

    Biography

    Brig. Gen. Dave Hodne became the 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson deputy commanding general June 9, 2017. Commissioned in the Infantry from the U.S. Military Academy in 1991, Hodne holds a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in Aerospace Engineering and a Master of Arts in Military Studies in Unconventional Warfare from American Military University. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and completed a U.S. Army War College Fellowship at Georgetown University.

    Hodne has diverse experience in Ranger, Stryker, cavalry, mechanized and light infantry formations. Hodne also hosts experience in both conventional and special operations that includes command of two battalions in combat; 3rd Squadron, 4th U.S Cavalry in Iraq, and 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment in Afghanistan.

    Hodne subsequently established and commanded the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, making the 4th Infantry Division the only “balanced” division, replete with armor, infantry, and stryker formations. Prior to assuming his current responsibilities as the deputy commanding general (Maneuver) of the 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson, he most recently served as the executive officer to the commander, U.S. Central Command.

    Hodne's awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal; two Legions of Merit; four Bronze Star Medals; the Purple Heart; four Meritorious Service Medals; the Joint Service Commendation Medal; three Army Commendation Medals; the Air Force Commendation Medal; the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal; the Ranger Tab; the Combat and Expert Infantryman's Badges; the Master Parachutist Badge (with Bronze star); the Air Assault Badge; and Israeli, Canadian, Australian and Brazilian Parachutist Badges. His units earned two Valorous Unit Awards, two Joint Meritorious Unit Awards, and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for actions in combat. Hodne is also a Distinguished Member of the 75th Ranger Regiment.

  • Division Chief of Staff

    Biography

    Col. Miles Brown is a native of South Carolina. Commissioned a second lieutenant in ROTC from The Citadel, he has served in Korea, Kuwait and Iraq with stateside duty at Fort Stewart, Georgia; Fort Hood, Texas; Fort Riley, Kansas; and Washington, DC. His staff and joint assignments include company fire support officer; battalion fire direction officer; deputy director of the President’s Emergency Operations Center; battalion S-3; aide-de-camp to the commanding general, Multi-National Forces-Iraq; and special assistant to the chief of staff, U.S. Army. Brown’s commands include a howitzer battery in Kuwait, an artillery battalion in Iraq, and a brigade combat team in Kuwait. He has served seven tours in Southwest Asia during operations Desert Fox, Intrinsic Action, Desert Spring, Iraqi Freedom, New Dawn, Spartan Shield, and Eager Lion.

    Brown’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (two oak leaf clusters), the Iraqi Campaign Medal (four campaign stars), the Combat Action Badge, and the Presidential Service Badge. He is a graduate of the Field Artillery Officer Basic Course, the Armor Captains Career Course, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and the National War College. His civilian education includes degrees in history, administration, and national security strategy from Central Michigan University and National Defense University.

  • Division History

    The 4th Infantry Division is the preeminent team of combat-focused Soldiers, Families, and supporting community members achieving excellence in the support of each other and the Army’s mission.

    As the Army’s only balanced division with the combination of armor, light, and Stryker infantry, the 4th Inf. Div. is the most versatile division in the United States Army providing options to joint force commanders consistent with today’s Army Operating Concept.

    The 4th Inf. Div. is trained and ready to fight and win; Iron Horse Soldiers and civilians are certified, agile, and adaptive professionals of character committed to sustaining readiness and caring for Families and communities.

    In keeping with the rich history and service to the community of the Mountain Post, the 4th Inf. Div. is proud to be the face of Fort Carson and a loyal partner with the community. Working together, the 4th Inf. Div. and Fort Carson build and maintain combat-ready expeditionary forces necessary to fight and win in complex environments as members of joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational teams and as a mission command element.

    The “Iron Horse” Division and Fort Carson provide first class support to Soldiers, Airmen, civilians, and Families; and enable unified action with community, state, and interagency partners to accomplish all assigned missions.

    On December 10, 1917, the same year that America entered World War I, the 4th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, was organized at Camp Greene, North Carolina to begin its long tradition of service to the Nation. Filled with draftees, the 4th Div., whose insignia had been adopted by its first commanding general, Major General George H. Cameron, became known as the “Ivy” Division. Its insignia consisted of four green ivy leaves on a khaki background. The division also derived its numerical designation from the Roman numeral IV; hence the nickname, “Ivy” Division. The division’s motto, “Steadfast and Loyal,” has described the Iron Horse Soldier for nearly 100 years. On December 10, 1917, the same year that America entered World War I, the 4th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, was organized at Camp Greene, North Carolina to begin its long tradition of service to the Nation. Filled with draftees, the 4th Div., whose insignia had been adopted by its first commanding general, Major General George H. Cameron, became known as the “Ivy” Division. Its insignia consisted of four green ivy leaves on a khaki background. The division also derived its numerical designation from the Roman numeral IV; hence the nickname, “Ivy” Division. The division’s motto, “Steadfast and Loyal,” has described the Iron Horse Soldier for nearly 100 years.

    By June 1918, the entire division had arrived in France, and before entering combat in July for the Aisne-Marne Offensive, the 4th fought with distinction across France and received great praise for their heroic efforts during St. Mariel and the Muese-Argonne campaigns. With the Armistice signed on Nov. 11, the division moved to serve both the French and British sectors as well as all Corps in the American sector and was the first to crack the Hindenburg Line.

    The 4th Infantry Division was reactivated in June 1940 and began training immediately for war. Sent to England in January 1944 for amphibious training prior to D-Day, the Ivy Division was first ashore, landing at Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. After a successful landing and breakout from Normandy, the 4th pushed into France and liberated Paris. The division then moved to Luxembourg where the 4th Inf. Div. became the first U.S. Soldiers to breach the Siegfried line and enter Germany. The 4th moved north to face the enemy in the bloody Hurtgen Forest and after weeks of brutal combat returned to Luxembourg for action in the Battle of the Bulge. The 4th Inf. Div. halted the enemy advance in December, gained the offensive and attacked across the Rhine and into eastern Germany during the spring of 1945.

    The Fighting Fourth was again called into action in the fall of 1965 and sent to Vietnam. The division was given a large area of the Central Highlands to control and a base camp was soon established at Pleiku. During the next four years, the 4th Inf. Div. engaged the enemy in brutal combat, conducting search and destroy missions and constant patrols to defend their assigned territory. They eliminated enemy incursions moving from the Ho Chi Minh Trail thru Cambodia and Laos. When the division departed Vietnam in late 1970, it had earned 11 campaign streamers and 12 Soldiers had earned the Medal of Honor.

    The 4th Inf. Div. returned to combat in 2003 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and would deploy multiple times during the next eight years. After arriving in April 2003, the division established Task Force Iron Horse at Tikrit and engaged the enemy north of Baghdad. In December 2003, the 4th along with special operations forces captured Saddam Hussein. The 4th Inf. Div. Headquarters returned in both 2005 and 2007 to command Multi-National Division-Baghdad and the division’s brigade combat teams also made multiple deployments in support of the war. During their service in Iraq, Iron Horse Soldiers would balance combat in July for the Aisne-Marne Offensive, the 4th fought with distinction across France and received great praise for their heroic efforts during St. Mariel and the Muese-Argonne campaigns. With the Armistice signed on Nov. 11, the division moved to serve both the French and British sectors as well as all Corps in the American sector and was the first to crack the Hindenburg Line. The 4th Infantry Division was reactivated in June 1940 and began training immediately for war. Sent to England in January 1944 for amphibious training prior to D-Day, the Ivy Division was first ashore, landing at Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. After a successful landing and breakout from Normandy, the 4th pushed into France and liberated Paris. The division then moved to Luxembourg where the 4th Inf. Div. became the first U.S. Soldiers to breach the Siegfried line and enter Germany. The 4th moved north to face the enemy in the bloody Hurtgen Forest and after weeks of brutal combat returned to Luxembourg for action in the Battle of the Bulge. The 4th Inf. Div. halted the enemy advance in December, gained the offensive and attacked across the Rhine and into eastern Germany during the spring of 1945. The Fighting Fourth was again called into action in the fall of 1965 and sent to Vietnam. The division was given a large area of the Central Highlands to control and a base camp was soon established at Pleiku. During the next four years, the 4th Inf. Div. engaged the enemy in brutal combat, conducting search and destroy missions and constant patrols to defend their assigned territory. They eliminated enemy incursions moving from the Ho Chi Minh Trail thru Cambodia and Laos. When the division departed Vietnam in late 1970, it had earned 11 campaign streamers and 12 Soldiers had earned the Medal of Honor. The 4th Inf. Div. returned to combat in 2003 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and would deploy multiple times during the next eight years. After arriving in April 2003, the division established Task Force Iron Horse at Tikrit and engaged the enemy north of Baghdad. In December 2003, the 4th along with special operations forces captured Saddam Hussein. The 4th Inf. Div. Headquarters returned in both 2005 and 2007 to command Multi-National Division-Baghdad and the division’s brigade combat teams also made multiple deployments in support of the war. During their service in Iraq, Iron Horse Soldiers would balance aggressive operations to eliminate threats with massive rebuilding projects and sophisticated training programs. The Iron Horse Division deployed, serving as the command for MND-North in support of Operation New Dawn, in 2010.

    The Al Qaeda attacks of September 11, 2001 resulted in a swift and unified action to destroy those responsible. The U.S. Army invaded Afghanistan in 2001 to search for and destroy al Qaeda, its sympathizers and its leader Osama Bin Laden. The action became known as Operation Enduring Freedom and focused on eliminating the Taliban organization which supported al Qaeda and practiced domestic terrorism against the people of Afghanistan. As the war evolved U.S. and NATO forces increased in number to also provide necessary security training and infrastructure development for a free and democratic Afghanistan.

    The Iron Horse Division cased its colors again, June 24, 2013, symbolizing the beginning of the Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion’s one-year deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The division deployed part of its headquarters to support NATO’s International Security Assistance Force Regional Command-South in its mission to support and enable Afghanistan’s National Security Forces to conduct security operations and create the necessary conditions to promote economic development and governance in the Kandahar, Zabul, Uruzgan and Daykundi provinces.

    After returning from their deployment to Regional Command-South, Afghanistan, the 4th Inf. Div. received the Army’s Regionally Allocated Forces mission in Europe. Arriving in Europe Feb. 13, 2015, the 4th Inf. Div. Mission Command Element serves as an intermediate headquarters for U.S. Army Europe, operating in support of Atlantic Resolve.

    The 4th Inf. Div. headquarters was the first division-level headquarters to deploy to Europe as part of the regionally allocated forces concept. The MCE is a headquarters element tailored to provide mission command for all U.S. ground forces participating in Atlantic Resolve, and oversees continuous, enhanced multinational training and security cooperation activities with allies and partners in Eastern Europe, to include countries of Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Germany.

    The 4th Inf. Div. has earned 22 campaign streamers for participation in World War I, World War II, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Since World War I, 25 Soldiers were awarded the nation’s highest honor, the Medal of Honor. Staff Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha and Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter are two recent Soldiers to receive the nation’s highest military award for extraordinary gallantry and selfless actions during the Battle of Kamdesh at Combat Outpost Keating, Afghanistan, on Oct. 3, 2009. Capt. Florent A. Groberg was the latest Iron Horse Soldier to receive the Medal of Honor from the President, Nov. 12, 2015.

    The Iron Horse Division remains regionally engaged supporting multiple operations and mission sets the world round, from North America to Europe, Afghanistan and abroad. 4th Inf. Div. Soldiers demonstrate unparalleled competence, character and agility in their training and their mission. Iron Horse Soldiers are fit, disciplined and trained to the 4th Inf. Div. fundamentals – prepared to fight and win, whenever and wherever called.

  • 4th Infantry Division March

    4th Infantry Division March

    Steadfast and loyal,
    We're fit to fight!
    The nation's finest Soldiers,
    Keep liberty's light.
    Our Soldiers roar for freedom,
    We're fit for any test.
    The mighty 4th Division ...
    America's best!

1SBCT

  • Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Monté Rone assumed command of 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Aug. 30, 2017. He received his commission as an infantry officer following graduation from Eastern Michigan University in 1995. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced courses, Airborne School, Ranger School, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and the U.S. Army War College.

    Prior to assuming command of 1st SBCT, Rone served as the J3 operations director for Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa, the G3 operations officer for the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss, Texas, and he commanded 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Other command assignments include tours as the commander, Company B and Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division.

    Rone’s previous non-command assignments include service as an Infantry Branch assignment officer, battalion operations officer, brigade operations officer, and brigade executive officer.

    Rone holds a Master’s of Policy Management degree from Georgetown University, a Master’s in Strategic Studies from the U.S. Army War College, and a Bachelor’s of Business Administration degree with a focus in accounting and auditing from Eastern Michigan University. His awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom campaign medals, the Senior Parachutist Badge, the Aviation Crew Members Badge, the Combat and Expert Infantryman badges, and the Ranger Tab.

  • Brigade Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Charles W. Tennant enlisted in the United States Army in August 1989. He received his Basic and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. During his 27 years of service, Tennant has held numerous leadership positions including: squad leader, platoon sergeant, first sergeant and command sergeant major.

    His previous assignments include 4th Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, Fort Ord, California; 4th Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis, Washington; Joint Security Area Panmonjom, Demilitarized Zone, Korea; 6th Ranger Training Battalion, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida; Area Support Group, Kuwait; 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis; and 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson.

    Throughout his career, Tennant continued to further his military education and training. He completed every Noncommissioned Officer Education System course, culminating in and graduating from Class 39(NR) of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. His other military education includes Ranger School, Basic Airborne School, Air Assault School, Nuclear Biological Chemical Officer Course and Equal Opportunity Leaders Course, and he is in the final stages of earning a Bachelor’s degree in Human Resources Management.

    Tennant’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal with five oak leaf clusters, the Army Achievement Medal with five oak leaf clusters, Good Conduct Medal – Eighth Award, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with star, Iraq Campaign medal with two stars, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korea Defense Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon with numeral 3, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon with numeral 8, United Nations Medal, NATO Medal, Joint Meritorious Unit Award, Valorous Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Ranger Tab, Combat Infantryman Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, U.S. Army Parachutist Badge, German Parachutist Badge, and the Air Assault Badge. He is a member of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club, and is a recipient of the Aubrey “Red” Newman Award, the St. Maurice Medallion (Bronze), the Honorable Order of Saint Barbara, the Noble Patron of Armor Award, and holds both Gold and Silver Spurs.

  • Unit History

    The 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team is comprised of seven subordinate units including: 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment; the 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment; the 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment; 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 12th Field Artillery Regiment; the 299th Engineer Battalion; and 4th Brigade Support Battalion.

    The "Raider" Brigade, 4th Infantry Division was constituted Nov. 19, 1917, in the Regular Army as Headquarters Troop, 4th Division.

    The unit participated in World War I and was involved in numerous campaigns including Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne, and Lorraine.

    It reorganized July 6, 1942, as Headquarters Company, 4th Division in preparation for the initial assault into Normandy.

    Following the end of the Second World War, the unit was inactivated March 12, 1946, at Camp Butner, N.C.

    The Raider Brigade served in Vietnam operating in numerous operations and counteroffensives. On Oct. 15, 1995, the brigade inactivated at Fort Carson, Colo., but was reactivated at Fort Hood, Texas Jan. 16, 1996.

    The Raider Brigade was reorganized and re-designated as the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division in 2004. Since 2003 the Raider Brigade has deployed three times in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and twice in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in both Afghanistan and Kuwait.

    The brigade has received numerous campaign participation credits, including Meuse-Argonne During World War I; Tet Counteroffensive in Vietnam; Pleiku Province in Korea, and Iraqi Governance as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom to name a few. A few of its more prestigious decorations include two Presidential Unit Citations, the Valorous Unit Award, the Army superior unit award, the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, and the Belgian Fourragere.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

2IBCT

  • Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Dave Zinn took command of 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, June 30, 2017.

    He was commissioned as an armor officer upon graduation from the United States Military Academy in 1995. His military education includes Armor Officer Basic Course, Armor Officer Advanced Course, Combined Arms and Services Staff School, Command and General Staff College, Scout Platoon Leader Course, Airborne School, Ranger School, and Jumpmaster School. He also earned a Master’s degree from the University of Chicago.

    His military assignments include 3rd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson as a tank platoon leader, scout platoon leader, and troop executive officer; 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas as the brigade plans officer and brigade reconnaissance troop commander; 3rd Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, Fort Hood as the Bravo Company commander; staff and faculty, United States Military Academy; 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, as the squadron executive officer; 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg as the brigade executive officer; III Corps, Fort Hood, as the aide-de-camp to the corps commander; Training and Doctrine Command, Fort Eustis, Virginia, as the aide-de-camp to the commanding general; 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment as the squadron commander; and Pentagon, Virginia, as the military assistant to the secretary of the Army. He recently completed a National Security Affairs Fellowship at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

    Zinn served three tours in Iraq, as a troop commander, squadron executive officer and brigade executive officer, and aide-de-camp to the corps commander; in Ba’qubah, eastern Baghdad, Diyala Province, and Mada’in Province. In 2014, he participated in Exercise Foal Eagle in South Korea and Exercise Balikatan in the Philippines.

    His military awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with oak leaf cluster, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (6th Award), Army Commendation Medal (3rd Award), numerous campaign and service medals, and the Combat Action Badge.

  • Brigade Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Anton J. Hillig was born and raised in Bismarck, North Dakota and enlisted as a cavalry scout in the United States Army in June 1993. He conducted One Unit Station Training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. During his 23-plus years of service, Hillig has held numerous leadership positions which include: squad leader, section sergeant, platoon sergeant, first sergeant, squadron operations sergeant major, and battalion command sergeant major.

    His previous assignments include: 1st Squadron, 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Polk, Louisiana; 2nd Battalion 72nd Armor Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Camp Casey, Korea; 1st Battalion, 32nd Armor Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington; 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson; 5th Squadron 15th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Knox; 6th Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Georgia; Joint Readiness Training Center, Task Force Three, Fort Polk; 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas; Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2-1 Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley; 1st Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment, 4th Infantry Division.

    Hillig has completed all Noncommissioned Officer Education System courses, culminating with graduating in Class 63 U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Joint Fire Power Training Course, Cavalry Leader Course and Scout Leader Course. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Troy University.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (two oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (six oak leaf clusters), Army Achievement Medal (five oak leaf clusters), Good Conduct Medal – seventh award, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal with three bronze stars, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon with numeral 4, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon with numeral 4, NATO Medal, Valorous Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, Parachutist Badge, Pathfinder Badge, Air Assault Badge, Combat Action Badge, and the Latvian Parachutist Badge. Hillig has been inducted into the Order of Saint George, the Order of Saint Maurice and awarded the General Aubrey Red Newman Award.

  • Unit History

    The 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, "Warhorse," was first constituted on November 19, 1917, in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 7th Infantry Brigade, an element of the 4th Division. It was then organized in December 1917 at Camp Greene, North Carolina. The Brigade served during World War I after which, the unit was reorganized and redesignated in March 1921 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Infantry Brigade. The unit was inactivated on September 21, 1921, at Camp Lewis, Washington. It was redesignated on March 23, 1925 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Brigade, relieved on August 15, 1927, from assignment to the 4th Division, and assigned to the 7th Division. It was relieved on October 1, 1933 from assignment to the 7th Division and assigned to the 4th Division. It was redesignated on August 24, 1936 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Infantry Brigade and disbanded on October 16, 1939.

    The unit was reconstituted on August 21, 1963, in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division and was activated on October 1, 1963 at Fort Lewis, Washington. During the Vietnam War, the 2nd Brigade received battlefield streamers for participation in 11 combat campaigns.

    After the Vietnam War, the 2nd Brigade was inactivated in 1989 and reactivated on December 15, 1995 at Fort Hood, Texas, the Brigade led the Army's Force XXI experimentation and validation, shaping the force of the 21st Century.

    In March 2003, the 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division deployed to the Middle East in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    In late 2006, the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division moved from Fort Hood, Texas to Fort Carson, Colorado. The Brigade Combat Team cased its colors in January 2015. In February 2015 as part of the Army’s realignment initiative 4th IBCT, 4th Infantry Division cased its colors and subsequently reactivated to become the 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

3ABCT

  • Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Michael J. Simmering assumed command of 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team July 25, 2017. He was commissioned as an Armor Officer in May 1993 following graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

    His previous tours include deputy commander/chief of staff for the Joint Readiness Training Center and Fort Polk, Louisiana (2016-2017); commander, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, Fort Benning, Georgia (2015-2016); deputy command center director, United States Northern Command (2014-2015); division G3, 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson (2012-2013); commander, 1st Combined Arms Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division (2009-2012) with duty in the Arghandab Valley, Khandahar Province, Afghanistan (2011-2012); deputy chief of staff, 4th Infantry Division (2008-2009); regimental executive officer, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR), Fort Hood, Texas (2007-2008) with duty in Mosul, Iraq (2007); regimental S3 (Operations), 3rd ACR, Fort Carson and later at Fort Hood, Texas (2006-2007); S3 (Operations), 2nd Squadron, 3rd ACR, Fort Carson (2005-2006) with duty in Tal Afar, Iraq (2005-2006); chief of Plans, 3rd ACR (2004-2005); observer/controller (Grizzly Team) at the Combat Maneuver Training Center in Hohenfels, Germany (2001-2003); assistant S3 and later company commander for Company B, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, Fort Hood (1999-2001), operations officer, G3 (Force Modernization) III Corps and Fort Hood (1998); tank platoon leader, scout platoon leader, company executive officer, and assistant S-3 for 1st Squadron, 3rd ACR, at Fort Bliss, Texas (1994-1995) and later at Fort Carson (1996-1997).

    Simmering’s military education includes the Armor Officer Basic Course and Armor Officer Advanced Course (Fort Knox, Kentucky), Command and General Staff College (2004) and the Joint Advanced Warfighting School, National Defense University (2014). He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering Management from the United States Military Academy as well as Master’s degrees from Kansas State University and the National Defense University.

    Simmering’s awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit (one oak leaf cluster), Bronze Star (one oak leaf cluster), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), the Parachutist’s Badge, Air Assault Badge, and the Combat Action Badge.

  • Brigade Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Samuel C. Rapp, a native of Choctaw, Oklahoma, entered the Army in August 1994.

    Rapp completed M1 Abrams Armor Crewman One Station Unit Training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, and has been assigned to 2nd Battalion, 37th Armor Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, and 2nd Battalion, 63rd Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, in Vilseck, Germany; 1st Squadron, 12th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas; 2nd Battalion, 37th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Friedberg, Germany; 7th Army Noncommissioned Officers’ Academy, Grafenwoehr, Germany; 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Georgia; operations sergeant major for the 5th Squadron, 15th Cavalry Regiment, 194th Armored Brigade, at Fort Benning, Georgia; and as the command sergeant major for 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division at Fort Wainwright, Alaska.

    His operational deployments include one in support of Operation Able Sentry in Macedonia, one in support of the stabilization force in Bosnia-Herzegovinia, one in support of Joint Task Force East Romania, two in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and one in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Afghanistan.

    He has served in every non-commissioned officer leadership position from tank gunner to command sergeant major. His military education includes all courses in the Noncommissioned Officer Education System realm, culminating with Class 63 of the Sergeants Major Course; Battle Staff NCO Course, Small Group Instructor Training Course, Total Army Instructor Training Course, Master Fitness Trainer Course, and Modern Army Combatives Level I and II.

    Rapp's awards and decorations include: the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with Valor Device, Army Achievement Medal, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, GWOT Service Medal, Afghanistan Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon, Combat Action Badge and German Marksmanship Badge (Schutzenschnur-Gold). He is a member of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club, honorary member of the Sergeant Morales Club, Draper Armor Leadership Awardee, and recipient of the Order of Saint George Bronze Medallion.

  • Unit History

    The 3rd Brigade was constituted 19 November 1917 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 8th Infantry Brigade, as an element of the 4th Infantry Division. It was organized in December 1917 at Camp Greene, N.C. The Brigade has been reorganized and redesignated several times over the years. Finally, on 15 December 1970, it was activated at Fort Carson, Colo., as 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division.

    When the Division Headquarters moved to Fort Hood, Texas in 1995, the brigade remained at Fort Carson and was redesignated as the 3rd Brigade Combat Team (3rd BCT). In May 2006 the brigade completed its transformation to the Army's modular design.

    The brigade has received numerous campaign participation credits, including Aisne-Marne and Meuse-Argonne During World War I; Counteroffensive, Phases II-VI, and Tet Counteroffensive in Vietnam; and Operation Iraqi Freedom I of the War on Terrorism to name a few. A few of its more prestigious decorations include the Presidential Unit Citation, the Valorous Unit Award, the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, and the Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class.

    The 3rd Brigade Combat Team is comprised of nearly 3,800 Soldiers including: 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment; the 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment; the 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment; the 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment; the 3rd Special Troops Battalion; and 64th Brigade Support Battalion.

    The 3rd BCT has deployed four times in a span of seven years in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; from 2003-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008 and later, Operation New Dawn from 2010-2011. In Iraq, the brigade's mission included several key areas: neutralizing the anti-Iraqi forces, building a capable Iraqi Security Force, legitimizing a responsive government, and putting Iraqis in the lead. During the latter half of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the beginning of Operation New Dawn, from March 2010-2011, the 3rd BCT had the mission to serve as an advise and assist brigade responsible for advising, training, and assisting Iraqi Security Forces. During that deployment, they provided training and assistance to Iraqi security forces, while simultaneously assisting the Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT) in helping the Iraqi government rebuild its civil capacity and infrastructure. While there, the brigade fell under the command of the 1st Infantry Division and the 36th Infantry Division in the southern four provinces of Iraq.

    Along with its organic elements, the brigade partnered with two Iraqi Army Divisions, 10th IA Division and 14th IA Division; 4th Region DBE with the 9th, 10th, and 14th Brigades; three ports of entry one each at Safwan, Al Sheeb, and Shalamcheh; one Federal Police Brigade; the Iraqi Highway Police in Dhi Qar Province; and Iraqi police with four separate provincial directors of police. The brigade also partnered with four PRT, responsible for securing movement, assessing projects and managing commanders' emergency response funds.

    The brigade's units worked with their partners diligently; training, mentoring and providing enablers when needed to assist the Iraqis to develop an effective and lethal security force capable of defeating the anti-Iraqi forces and supporting the elected government. The 3rd BCT returned to Fort Carson in March 2011.

    The 3rd BCT sent more than 300 of its officers and senior noncommissioned officers in April and May of 2012, on a nine-month deployment to the southern provinces of Afghanistan to help mentor and train current Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF). While supporting their deployed leadership, the remaining “Iron Brigade” Soldiers, NCO's and officers continue to train and prepare to maintain combat readiness to fulfill any future mission requirements.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

4CAB

  • Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. W. Scott Gallaway assumed command of 4th Combat Aviation Brigade July 21, 2017. He is a native of Bernardsville, New Jersey, and received his commission from the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at Rutgers University in 1996. Over the past 21 years, Gallaway has served in a variety of tactical and strategic assignments to include four combat deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq and two overseas postings to Kuwait and South Korea. He has deployed as an Apache helicopter platoon leader (Kuwait), Apache helicopter company commander (Afghanistan), aviation task force operations officer (Iraq), aviation brigade operations officer (Afghanistan), and most recently as an aviation battalion task force commander (Afghanistan). Other key assignments include strategist in Army War Plans, assistant executive officer to the Army G-3/5/7, and special assistant to the Army’s chief of staff. In lieu of the senior service college, Gallaway was selected for the Army’s Strategic Planning and Policy Program (ASP3).

    Gallaway holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Rutgers University, a Master’s degree in Joint Planning from the Army’s Command and General Staff College, and a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is currently pursuing a PhD in International Studies from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver.

    His military awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (five oak leaf clusters), Air Medal, Combat Action Badge, Senior Army Aviator Badge, Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, and the Order of Saint Michael (Bronze).

  • Brigade Chief Warrant Officer

    Biography

    Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jimmie Brooks enlisted the U.S. Army in October 1989. He attended Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training as a light wheeled vehicle mechanic at Fort Dix, New Jersey, with his first duty station being with the 3rd Explosive Ordinance Detachment located in Augsburg, Germany. In December 1990 he deployed in support of operations Desert Shield, Storm and Saber.

    After returning from deployment, he was selected to attend Warrant Officer Candidate School and Flight School. From November 1991 through April 1992 he was assigned to the 10th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH), located at Fort Carson. From April 1992 through June 1993, Brooks attended Warrant Officer Candidate School and Flight School learning to fly in the UH-1 Huey and then transitioning into the OH-58A/C Scout helicopter. In August 1999, Brooks transitioned again to the AH-64 Apache helicopter in which he is still current and qualified in to date.

    His military education courses include the Warrant Officer Basic Course , Warrant Officer Staff and Senior Staff Courses, Instructor Pilot, Instrument Flight Examiner, Master Gunner, Aviation Mission Survivability Officer and Aviation Material Officers Course.

    Brooks’ deployments include: Operations Desert Shield/Storm/Saber (December 1990 to June 1991); Operation Iraqi Freedom, Al Asad Air Base (April 2003 to April 2004); OIF 07-09, Baghdad (July 2008 to February 2009); Operation New Dawn, Talil, Iraq, (February 2011 to December 2011) and Operation Enduring Freedom, Kandahar, Afghanistan (March 2014 to November 2014).

    His awards include Bronze Star Medals, Meritorious Service Medals, Air Medals, Army Commendation Medals, Army Achievement Medal and the Good Conduct Medal.

  • Brigade Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Marty H. Book, a native of Port Royal, Pennsylvania, entered the Army in June 1988 and attended Basic Training at Fort Dix, New Jersey, and Advance Individual Training at Fort Rucker, Alabama

    He has served the Army as a tactical (UH-60) and utility (UH-1) helicopter repairer, technical inspector, flight instructor, AIT instructor, recruiter, platoon sergeant, forward operating base mayor, first sergeant, battalion command sergeant major, and brigade operations sergeant major. His assignments include: 507th Medical Company AA, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Company B, 1st Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, South Korea; Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Bn., 24th Avn. Reg., Fort Stewart, Georgia; Company A 2nd Bn., 2nd Aviation Regiment, South Korea; Company K, 159th Avn. Reg., Fort Stewart; Blue Ribbon Recruiting Bn., Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Company A, 602nd ASB, South Korea; 1st Staff and Faculty USAALS, Fort Eustis, Virginia.; Company B, 1st Bn., 222nd Avn. Reg., Fort Eustis; Company A, 501st Avn. Reg., Germany; Company D, 2nd Bn., 501st Avn. Reg., Germany; Company D, 2nd Bn., 159th AHB, Germany; HHC 5th Bn., 101st Avn. Reg., Fort Campbell, Kentucky; 2nd Bn., 158th AHB, Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington; 1st Aviation Brigade, Fort Rucker, Alabama. Book has been deployed in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.

    Book has attended all levels of the Noncommissioned Officers Education System, culminating with the United States Sergeants Major Academy class 62. He graduated from Juniata High School in Pennsylvania, earned his Bachelors of Science in Professional Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida and received his Master in Business Administration (MBA) from Excelsior College in New York.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (two oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Air Medal, Army Commendation Medal (one silver oak leaf cluster), Army Achievement Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Valorous Unit Citation Ribbon (one oak leaf cluster), Army Superior Unit Award, Good conduct Medal (ninth award), National Defense Service Medal (second Award), Korean Defensive Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon (with numeral 4), Overseas Service Ribbon (with numeral 5), Military Volunteerism Service Medal and NATO Medal and is a member of the Order of St Michael. He has additionally earned the Master Aviation, Air Assault, Recruiter, and Drivers badges.

  • Unit History

    The "Iron Eagles" were first constituted on April 1, 1957, as the 4th Aviation Company, assigned to the 4th Infantry Division and activated at Fort Lewis, Wash. It was reorganized and redesignated Oct. 1, 1963, as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Aviation Battalion.

    The 4th Aviation Battalion deployed to the Republic of Vietnam in September 1966, where it participated in multiple campaigns and was awarded two Republic of Vietnam Crosses of Gallantry and one Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal. The unit redeployed back to the United States in 1970. It was inactivated Dec. 4, 1970, at Fort Lewis.

    4th Aviation Battalion was redesignated Nov. 21, 1972, as Aviation Company, 4th Infantry Division, and activated at Fort Carson, Colo. It was again reorganized and redesignated March 17, 1980 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Aviation Battalion, and again Aug. 16, 1987, as 4th Aviation. In 1995, the unit was relocated to Fort Hood, Texas, with the 4th Infantry Division. On Oct. 1, 2005, the unit was again redesignated as the 4th Aviation Regiment.

    The Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, deployed twice in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, once in 2005 and again in 2008, and was awarded two Meritorious Unit Citations. The unit's most recent deployment was in 2010 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, after which the brigade was awarded a Valorous Unit Award. Task Force Iron Eagle supported 22 allied nations across four regional commands, the largest geographical area of any combat aviation brigade.

    The Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, was inactivated in September 2011 at Fort Hood. The 4th CAB Brigade Headquarters and Headquarters Company was reactivated July 2, 2013, at Fort Carson.

    One of the first battalions to reactivate, 2nd General Support Aviation Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment, 4th CAB, activated April 2013. In May 2014, the remaining four battalions reactivated. They were 1st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment; 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 4th Avn. Reg.; 4th ARB, 4th Avn. Reg.; and 404th Aviation Support Battalion.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

DIVARTY

  • DIVARTY Commander

    Biography

    Col. Norberto Menéndez was commissioned a lieutenant of Field Artillery and was earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science upon graduation as a distinguished military graduate from Florida International University in 1997. He also holds Masters of Arts degrees in National Security and Strategic Studies from the United States Naval War College and the United States Army War College. Military education includes Field Artillery Officer Basic Course, Cavalry Leader’s Course, Infantry Captains Career Course (ICCC), and the College of Naval Command and Staff.

    Menéndez’s first assignment was in 3rd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division DIVARTY at Fort Hood, Texas, where he deployed in support of Operation Joint Forge to Bosnia-Herzegovina. After completion of the ICCC in 2001, Menéndez was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Upon arrival to the 82d, he reported to 3rd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, where he served as a task force fire support officer for 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, battalion assistant operations officer, and commander of Battery A (105mm Towed). Menéndez was then assigned to the 82nd ABN DIVARTY Headquarters to command Headquarters and Headquarters Battery. Upon completion of command, he served as aide-de-camp to the commanding general, 82nd Airborne Division. While assigned to the 82nd ABN DIV, Menéndez deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan twice (January-August 2003 and January 2007 to April 2008). After completion of assignment to the 82nd ABN DIV, Menéndez studied at the Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, Rhode Island, and immediately after graduation from NWC he was assigned the 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division at Fort Carson, where he assumed duties as operations officer for 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment, in July 2009. In December 2009, he was reassigned as executive officer for 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment, and deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn from March 2010 to March 2011. From August 2011 to July 2013, Menéndez served at NATO Headquarters Allied Force Command – Madrid, in Madrid, Spain, as a land component planner. In August 2013, he assumed command of 1st Battalion, 37th Field Artillery Regiment, 7th Infantry Division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. After command, he studied at the U.S. Army War College from July 2015 to June 2016. Menéndez’s most recent assignment was as G3 for the 3rd Infantry Division.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (with five oak leaf clusters), Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Combat Action Badge, and the Master Parachutist Badge.

  • DIVARTY Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Benito A Perez Jr was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and entered the National Guard in Los Angeles, California, July 14, 1989, and attended One Station Unit Training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, graduating as a 13B mechanical crewman in the Field Artillery. Perez joined the regular Army Feb. 7, 1990.

    Perez has served in a variety of assignments, which include; advance party, Battery A, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Campbell, Kentucky; ammo team chief, Battery C, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, Kirch Goens, Germany; Howitzer Gunner, Battery A, 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery, Fort Carson; Howitzer section chief, Battery A, 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Benning, Georgia; Battery A, 1st Battalion, 15th Field Artillery Regiment, Camp Casey, Korea; drill sergeant, Battery D, 1st Battalion, 19thField Artillery Regiment; Battery B, 1st Battalion, 40th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; platoon sergeant, Battery C, 3rdBattalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas; senior instructor writer, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 30th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; first sergeant, Battery E, 1st Battalion, 22nd Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; senior enlisted advisor for the 3rd Division Military Transition Team, Fort Riley, Kansas; battalion operation sergeant major, 2nd Battalion, 5th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; brigade operation sergeant major, 214 Fires Brigade, Fort Sill; senior enlisted advisor for the 4th Iraq Army Division Military Transition Team, Fort Polk, Louisiana; operation sergeant major, 7thSquadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson; command sergeant major, 3rd Battalion 16th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Carson; command sergeant major, 2nd Brigade ABCT 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson; command sergeant major, 1st Battalion, 290th Field Artillery Regiment; and command sergeant major, Camp Atterbury, Indiana. Also, Perez previously served in five campaigns: Operation Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom 1 and 5, Operation New Dawn and Operation Spartan Shield.

    Perez’s military education includes the Primary Leadership Development Course, the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course, the Advanced Non-Commissioned Officer Course, First Sergeant Course, the United States Sergeants Major Academy (class 59), Drill Sergeant School, and Air Assault School. Perez received a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Psychology from Park University.

    His awards and decorations include; The Bronze Star (with oak leaf cluster), Meritorious Service Medal (with four oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (With V device, and silver oak leaf cluster), Army Achievement Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, Driver Badge, Air Assault Badge, Combat Action Badge, The Honorable Order of Saint Barbara and The Order of Saint Maurice.

  • Unit History

    The unit was first constituted on November 19, 1917 as Headquarters Battery, 4th Field Artillery Brigade, and assigned to the 4th Infantry Division. The unit was organized for combat operations at Camp Greene, North Carolina from December 15, 1917 to January 10, 1918. 4th Field Artillery Brigade departed for World War I in Europe in the winter of 1918. Upon returning stateside, the 4th Field Artillery Brigade was stationed at Camp Lewis, Washington where it was inactivated on September 21, 1921. 4th Field Artillery Brigade was re-designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Field Artillery Brigade at Fort Sill, Oklahoma January 1, 1935 and then disbanded on November 14, 1939. Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Field Artillery was reconstituted on September 10, 1940 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery (DIVARTY). Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery was activated October 1, 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia and participated in multiple World War II campaigns. The unit was inactivated on March 5, 1946 at Camp Butler, North Carolina. On July 6, 1948, at Fort Ord California, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery was again activated. April 1, 1957, at Fort Lewis, Washington, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery was reorganized and re-designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Infantry DIVARTY. By December 1970, the unit returned from South Vietnam to Fort Carson, Colorado. During that same year, the unit re-designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th infantry Division Artillery (Mechanized). This last re-designation named the Division Artillery the "Iron Gunners," which complemented the "Ironhorse" Division. With the realignment and downsizing of the Army force, the unit was reassigned to Fort Hood, Texas on December 15, 1995. On December 16, 2004, the transformation and restructuring of the 4th Infantry Division Artillery marked the Army's first modular fires brigade. The brigade then inactivated April 16, 2007 at Fort Hood, Texas because of the realignment of Army units. On May 6, 2015 the unit was re-designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Infantry Division Artillery at Fort Carson, Colorado and unfurled its colors on Founders Field May 14.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

4SB

  • Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Geoffrey Kent assumed command of the 4th Infantry Sustainment Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, July 25, 2017, after graduating from the National Defense University and completing consecutive command tours at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He commanded the 782nd Brigade Support Battalion for the 4th Brigade Combat Team and 82nd Airborne Division and also the support squadron for 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment (Delta). He possesses a wide range of conventional and nonconventional experience deploying numerous times worldwide, where he’s gained significant joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational experience.

    Kent grew up in the National Capital Region and headed south to earn his bachelor’s degree and ROTC commission from the University of Alabama. He holds two master’s degrees - one in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College and another in National Resource Strategy from the Eisenhower School at National Defense University. In addition, he’s earned his certificate in the Advanced Program in Logistics and Technology from the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School.

    Kent served in several challenging joint, SOF and conventional assignments over the course of 23 years in support of sensitive missions and major operations. These include operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and Inherent Resolve and MIA recovery missions in Vietnam, Laos, North Korea and China (Tibet). His key command and staff positions include: headquarters and supply company commander for the 801st Main Support Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) at Fort Campbell, Kentucky; MIA recovery team commander with the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii; supply and support operations officer for Task Force 1-160th & regiment/brigade supply officer (S4) for the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment at Fort Campbell; Task Force 3-73 J4 at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan; aide de camp to the commanding general, Installation Management Command (IMCOM); staff officer with Joint Staff J5, Pakistan Afghanistan Coordination Cell (PACC); and executive officer to the deputy commander for support at U.S. Forces Command - Afghanistan (USFOR-A) in Kabul.

    Kent is a graduate of the Airborne, Air Assault, and Jumpmaster Courses. In addition, he’s a graduate of the Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE - Level C High Risk) course. His military decorations include the Bronze Star (one oak leaf cluster), the Defense Meritorious Service Medal (one oak leaf cluster) and the Meritorious Service Medal (three oak leaf clusters). He is authorized to wear the Combat Action Badge, the Senior Parachutist Badge, the Air Assault Badge, the Rigger Badge and both the French and British Parachutist Wings. He is also recognized as a distinguished member of the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment.

  • Brigade Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Demetrius Brown is a native of Magnolia, Mississippi. He entered the Army Sept. 15, 1988, as a light wheel vehicle mechanic. He attended Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Dix, New Jersey, where he was inducted into the Ordnance Corps.

    Brown’s assignments include Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 14th Engineer Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, Fort Ord, California, as a light wheel vehicle mechanic; 71st Ordnance Company, Hanau, Germany, as a senior wheel vehicle mechanic; 181st Chemical Company, Fort Hood, Texas, as a motor sergeant; Delta Battery, 1st Battalion, 22nd Field Artillery, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as a drill sergeant; HHC, 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, as a motor sergeant; HHC 3rd Bde., 3rd ID, as a motor sergeant; F Company (FSC), 203rd BSB, 3rd Bde, 3rd ID, as a first sergeant; HHC, 203rd BSB, 3rd Bde., 3rd ID, as a first sergeant; HHC, 59th Ordnance Bde., Fort Lee, Virginia, as a chief instructor/writer; HHC, 59th Ordnance Bde., Fort Lee, Virginia, as the brigade operations sergeants major; and Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 1st Infantry Division, as the battalion command sergeant major.

    Brown’s military and civilian education includes Primary Leadership Development Course, Basic Noncommissioned Officer Course, Advanced Noncommissioned Officer Course, Drill Sergeant School, Army Basic Instructor Course, Master Fitness School, Support Operations Phase II, the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy (Class 63) and the Battalion Pre Command Course. He completed an associate degree in general studies from Central Texas College, a Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts from Excelsior College and a Master in Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management from Excelsior College.

    Brown’s awards include the Bronze Star Medal (three oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (three oak leaf clusters), the Army Commendation Medal (five oak leaf clusters), the Army Achievement Medal (four oak leaf clusters), the Presidential Unit Citation, Valorous Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Award, Joint Military Unit Award, the Army Good Conduct Medal (ninth award), National Defense Service Medal with bronze star, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal (four Bronze Stars), Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (Number 4), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas service Ribbon (fifth award), Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, Combat Action Badge, Mechanic’s Badge, Driver Wheel and Track Badge. He is also the recipient of the Order of Samuel Sharp and the Order of Saint Maurice.

    Brown’s deployments include Operation Enduring Freedom; Operation Iraq Freedom I, III, V, VII; and Operation Inherent Resolve.

  • Unit History

    The unit was constituted into the Regular Army on January 18, 1966 as the 43rd General Support Group. The unit was activated on March 26, 1966 at Fort Carson, Colorado and organized on 16 May 1966. The first battalion to join the Group was the 68th Transportation Battalion which was activated in August 1966. Three more battalions joined the Group in 1967: 195th Maintenance Battalion on 23 February; 242nd Maintenance Battalion on 25 February; and 70th Ordnance Battalion on 1 March.

    On 26 July 1967, acting on a seven hour notification, HHC, 43rd and 352nd Transportation Company (Light Truck) deployed to Selfridges Air Force Base, Michigan, to provide logistical support for the elements of the XVIII Airborne Corps during riot control operations. In August and September 1967, units of the Group deployed to Alaska during severe flooding to establish a field laundry site. In 1968, the organization of the Group changed: the 336th Ordnance Battalion joined the Group on 20 May and the 242nd Maintenance Battalion, one of the Groups original members, inactivated on 25 August. In addition to Group organization changes, the 336th Ordnance Battalion deployed to Southeast Asia on 26 September 1968.

    In 1970 three military police companies (19th, 148th and 984th) and the 283rd Aviation Company joined the Group in May; the 40th Supply and Service Company joined the Group in November; and the 195th Maintenance Battalion (another of the Group's original members) inactivated on 4 December. In 1971 the 283rd Aviation Company was transferred to Fort Bragg in June; the 4th Military Police Company joined the Group; and a third original member, the 70th Ordnance Battalion, was inactivated in November. In 1972 the 19th Military Police Battalion was formed as a headquarters for the Military Police companies; the 52nd Engineer Battalion joined the Group in July; and the 4th Military Intelligence Company and B Company, 75th Infantry (Ranger) joined the Group in August. The Group was re-designated as the 43rd Corps Support Group in 1973.

    The 43rd served in Operation Desert Shield & Desert Storm; Operation Continue Hope; Operation Sea Signal; Operation Iraqi Freedom; and Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Effective July 17, 2008, the 43rd Area Support Group was re-designated as the 43rd Sustainment Brigade. As part of the reorganization, the 43rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion and 230th Financial Management Company (FMCO) were activated and the 10th Combat Support Hospital and 4th Engineer Battalion were reassigned away from the Brigade.

    The 43rd's most recent deployment was led by Col. Edward Daly into Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom XI. While deployed in Kandahar, the unit provided logistics to the United States forces operating in Regional Command-South and Regional Command-Southwest. They returned to Fort Carson in March 2011.

    The 43rd Sustainment Brigade was re-designated the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 4th Infantry Division effective July 9, 2015. As part of the reorganization, 4th Sustainment Brigade integrated fully into the overall 4th Infantry Division Command at Fort Carson to continue the outstanding support for 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson Soldiers.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

HHBN

  • Battalion Commander

    Biography

    Lt. Col. Justin R. Howe is a native of Irwin, Pennsylvania. In 1998, he graduated from The Citadel with a bachelor of science in business degree and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Air Defense Artillery.

    Upon completion of the Officer Basic Course, Howe was assigned to 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, Camp Casey, Korea, where he served as a Bradley stinger fighting vehicle platoon leader. In 2000, he was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment, 10th Mountain Division (Light), Fort Drum, New York where he served as the early warning platoon leader and Headquarters and Headquarters Battery executive officer. He was then assigned to Headquarters, 10th Mountain Division (Light) where he deployed to the countries of Kosovo as the assistant Division G3 Air and to Afghanistan as a battle captain.

    After completion of the Air Defense Captains Career Course, he served as the battalion S1 for 2nd Battalion, 44th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). He later served as the battery commander for Delta Battery, 2-44 ADA.

    Howe next served as the assistant professor of Military Science at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Howe then moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, to serve as the S3 for 2nd Battalion, 6th Air Defense Artillery Regiment and subsequently the S3 and DCO for 6th ADA Bde.

    Following completion of his tour at Fort Sill, Howe was stationed in Kuwait as the executive officer to the ARCENT DCG where he worked alongside. After a year, he returned to Fort Knox, Kentucky, to serve as an assignment officer for the Air Defense Artillery Branch. He most recently finished his third year at the Army Human Resource Command as the Active Component distribution chief.

    Howe's awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (one oak leaf cluster), Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (V-Device, three oak leaf clusters), Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, NATO (Kosovo) Medal, Kosovo Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon, and the German Army Proficiency Badge (Gold). He is a graduate of Air Assault School, Airborne School, and Ranger School. He also earned the Combat Action Badge during operations in Iraq.

  • Battalion Command Sergeant Major

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Rietta D. Owens enlisted into the Army March 25, 1992, completing Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, graduating as an administrative specialist. She has served in several leadership positions from section sergeant to battalion command sergeant major in her 26 years of military service.

    Owens' various assignments and positions throughout her career include: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Aviation Brigade Fort Ord, California; 566th Adjutant General Company (Postal), Schweinfurt, Germany; 90th Postal Company, Wurzburg, Germany; Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 187th Medical Battalion, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; United States Army Garrison, Fort Myer, Virginia; 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, Fort Jackson; 3rd Infantry Division Inspector General Office, Fort Stewart, Georgia; Headquarters Battalion, Fort Belvoir, Virginia; White House Military Office, Washington, D.C.; Army Review Boards Agency, Arlington, Virginia; and III Corps and Fort Hood Inspector General Office, Fort Hood, Texas. Owens’ deployment experience includes: Operation Joint Endeavor, Bosnia-Herzegovina; Operation Support Hope, Entebbe, Uganda; and Operation Iraqi Freedom III/VI.

    Owens is a graduate of all Noncommissioned Officers’ Education System courses culminating with Class 62 of the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. Owens is also a graduate of the First Sergeants Course; Army Drill Sergeant Course and The Inspector General Course. Her civilian education includes a Bachelor of Arts in Management from Columbia College and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) and a Master of Human Resources Management from Webster University.

    Owens' awards and decorations include the Bronze Star (second award), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (fourth award), Army Commendation Medal (fourth award), Army Achievement Medal (eighth award), Army Good Conduct Medal (seventh award), National Defense Service Medal (second award), Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal (two bronze stars), Global War of Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon (Numeral 4), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, NATO Medal, Joint Meritorious Unit Award (second award), Army Meritorious Unit Award, Presidential Service Badge, Army Staff Badge, and the Drill Sergeant Badge. She is also a member of the distinguished Sergeant Audie Murphy Club.

  • Unit History

    The Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion of the 4th Infantry Division was constituted in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 4th Division November 19, 1917. It was organized on December 10, 1917 at Camp Greene, North Carolina. The unit was inactivated September 21, 1921 at Camp Lewis, Washington and re-activated June 1, 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia.

    On August 1, 1942, the unit was reorganized and re-designated as Headquarters, 4th Motorized Division. It was again reorganized and re-designated on August 4, 1943 as Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division. The unit was inactivated march 12, 1946 at Camp Butner, North Carolina and re-activated July 15, 1947 at Fort Ord, California.

    HHBN was further reorganized and re-designated three more times. First, on June 13, 1960 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Infantry Division; second, on December 16, 2004 as Headquarters and Tactical Command Posts, 4th Infantry Division; and third, on May 16, 2009 as the Division Special Troops Battalion, 4th Infantry Division.

    The headquarters element of the 4th Infantry Division has participated in the following campaigns: Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne 1918 and Lorraine 1918 (WWI); Normandy (with arrowhead), Northern France, Rhinleand, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe (WWII); Counteroffensive Phase II, Counteroffensive Phase III, Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive Phase IV, Counteroffensive Phase V, Counteroffensive Phase VI, Tet 69/Counteroffensive, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter-Spring 1970, Sanctuary Counteroffensive and Counteroffensive Phase VII (Vietnam).

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

Family Readiness (FRG)

What is a family readiness group (FRG)?

An OFFICIAL command-sponsored organization of family members, volunteers and Soldiers belonging to a unit that together provide an avenue of SUPPORT and ASSISTANCE. FRGs act as a CONDUIT of INFORMATION and a COMMUNICATION LINE between the unit and the families. FRGs act as a CONDUIT of INFORMATION and a COMMUNICATION LINE between our Ft. Carson community and the families

Why should I connect with my family readiness group (FRG)?

  • Strong families make strong Soldiers! FRGs can empower families with accurate unit and community information.
  • Find out when your Soldier will be home and when your Soldier will be out in the field.
  • Be in the know about long weekends, vacation time and deployments.
  • Discover family benefits, discounts and opportunities that may be available to you and your children.
  • Information is Power. Your FRG wants to help empower YOU!

Visit your Soldier's unit homepage for more information. Click on the links on the left for 4th Infantry Division brigades or click here for tenant units. Click here for a list of unit staff duty phone numbers.

Resources
Child care
Fort Carson Civilian Personnel Advisory Center (CPAC)
Housing
Military Spouse Employment
School Info

Army Community Service (ACS)
Calendar
DFMWR Activities
Employment Readiness
Fort Carson Veterinary Center
Mountain Post Living
Mountaineer Newspaper
Virtual FRG




Welcome to Fort Carson Equal Opportunity (EO)

Mission: Advise, train and educate Command Teams, Soldiers and Family members to understand, use and execute the Army equal opportunity program in order to sustain and/or improve leadership and unit cohesion that maximizes human potential and ensures fair treatment for all persons based on merit, fitness, and capability in support of unit readiness.

Office address:
4th Infantry Division
Equal Opportunity Office
1853 Oconnell Street
BLDG 1042, 3rd Floor
Fort Carson, CO 80913

For information on sexual harrasment please visit the Ft. Carson SHARP website.

For Civilian Equal Opportunity information please visit the Equal Employment Opportunity website.

Are you in the right location?

Equal Opportunity Office: The U.S. Army will provide Equal Opportunity and fair Treatment for military personnel and Family members without regard to race, color, gender, religion, national origin and provide an environment free of unlawful discrimination and offensive behavior.

SHARP Office: Sexual harassment is a form of gender discrimination that involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature between the same or opposite genders. Sexual assault is a crime defined as intentional sexual contact characterized by use of force, physical threat or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent.

EEO Office: Provide quality EEO programs, services, training, and advice to the Fort Carson community that sustains a discrimination-free workplace.

Inspector General (IG) Office: Inspector General serves as an extension of the Commanding General by providing an independent and impartial assessment of the morale, welfare, and discipline of the Command and reports on other matters that impact upon the economy and or efficiency of the Command.

Office Guide
If you are... And you believe... You should contact...
A military service member or a dependant family member. You were treated unfairly based on your race, color, gender religion or national origin. Your unit's EO leader or EO advisor (not confidential)
You were sexually assualted Your unit's SHARP specialist. 24/7 SHARP helpline: 719.338.9654 (confidentiality and privelage)
You were sexually harrassed Your unit's SHARP specialist (Limited confidentiality)
A DA/DOD employee, former employee, or applicant for federal employment. You were treated unfairly based on your race, color, religion, national origin, sex (includes sexual harassment), age (40 and up), disability (physical and mental), reprisal, or genetics. The Fort Carson EEO Office (not confidential)
A US citizen You have a concern that pertains to an activity of the US Government, specifically the US Army and/or its members The Fort Carson IG Office (limited confidentiality)

Training

Welcome Letter

Training Dates
Class Date Location
04-18 02-11 APR 2018 BLDG 1042
05-18 04-13 JUN 2018 BLDG 1042
06-18 20-29 AUG 2018 BLDG 1042

Observances

Event Details
Observance Dates Location Guest Speaker Remarks
Holocaust Remembrance/Day; Days of Remembrance 8-15 April 2018 Held on: Mon, 9 April 2018 Time: 1500-1600 Elkhorn Conference Center TBA TBA
Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month 1-31 May 2018 Held on: Tues, 29 May 2018 Time: 1500-1600 Elkhorn Conference Center TBA TBA
Women’s Equality Day 26 August 2018 Held on: Mon, 27 Aug. 2018 Time: 1500-1600 Elkhorn Conference Center TBA TBA
Hispanic Heritage Month 15 Sep - 15 Oct 2018 Held on: Mon, 24 Sep. 2018 Time: 1500-1600 Elkhorn Conference Center TBA TBA
National American Indian Heritage Month 1-30 November 2018 Held on: Mon, 26 Nov. 2018 Time: 1500-1600 Elkhorn Conference Center TBA TBA

Resources

Military

Downloads

Non-military

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is the purpose of the Department of the Army Equal Opportunity Program?
The Department of the Army Equal Opportunity (EO) program formulates, directs, and sustains a comprehensive effort to maximize human potential and to ensure fair treatment for all persons based solely on merit, fitness, and capability in support of readiness.
2. What are the goals of the Army?s (EO) program?
To provide EO for military personnel, and family members, both on and off post and within the limits of the laws of localities, states, and host nations. Create and sustain effective units by eliminating discriminatory behaviors or practices that undermine teamwork, mutual respect, loyalty, and shared sacrifice of the men and women of America?s Army. Additionally, in many circumstances, DA civilians may use the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) complaint system.
3. What publication or Regulations governs the Army Equal Opportunity Program and Prevention of Sexual Harassment?
Army Regulations 600-20 Chapter 6 covers the Equal Opportunity Program in the Army. Chapter 7 covers the Prevention of Sexual Harassment, and Appendix E covers the EO/Sexual Harassment Complaint Processing System.
4. Does Headquarters Department of the Army EO have a Hotline?
Yes, 1 (800) 267-9964.
5. What areas of complaints does the EO complaints processing system address?
The EO complaints processing system addresses complaints that allege unlawful discrimination or unfair treatment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, and national origin.
6. What are two types of EO complaints?
Informal and Formal Complaint. An informal complaint is any complaint that as soldier, family member or DA civilian does not wish to file in writing. Informal complaints may be resolved directly by the individual, with the help of another unit member, the commander or other person in the complainant?s chain of command. A formal complaint is one that complaint files in writing and swears to the accuracy of the information. Formal complaints require specific actions, are subject to timelines, and require documentation of the actions taken.
7. What form is used to file a formal complaint?
DA Form 7279-R should be used file a formal complaint.
8. How much time does a Soldier have to file a formal complaint?
Soldiers has 60 calendar days from the date of the alleged incident in which to file a formal complaint. This time limit is established to set reasonable parameters for the inquiry or investigation and resolution of complaints, to include ensuring the availability of witnesses, accurate recollection of events, and timely remedial action. If a complaint is received after 60 calendar days, the commander may/may not conduct an investigation into the allegations or appoint an investigating officer.
9. The commander has how many days to conduct an investigation?
The commander has 14 calendar days (or three weekend drill periods for Reserve Components) in which to conduct an investigation, either personally or through appointment of an investigating officer. If due, to extenuating circumstances, it becomes impossible to conduct a complete investigation within 14 calendar days allowed, the command may obtain an extension from the next higher commander for usually not more than 30 calendar days.
10. What are my responsibilities when submitting a complaint?
a) Advise the command of the specifics of sexual harassment and unlawful discrimination complaints and provide the command an opportunity to take appropriate action to rectify/resolve the issue.
b) Submit only legitimate complaints and exercise caution against unfounded or reckless charges.
c) It is recommended that you attempt to resolve the complaint by first informing the alleged offender that the behavior must stop.
11. What are some techniques to deal with Sexual Harassment?
a) Direct approach. Confront the harasser and tell him/her that the behavior is not appreciated, not welcomed and that it must stop. Stay focused on the behavior not the impact. Use common courtesy. Write down the thoughts before approaching the individual involved.
b) Indirect approach. Send a letter to the harasser stating the facts, personal feelings about the inappropriate behavior and expected resolution.
c) Third party. Request assistance from another person. Ask someone else to talk to the harasser, to accompany the victim, or to intervene on behalf of the victim to resolve the conflict.
d) Chain of Command. Report the behavior to immediate supervisor or others in the chain of command and ask for assistance in resolving the situation.
e) File a formal complaint. Details for filing an informal or formal complaint are in AR 600-20, Appendix D.
12. How do I become an Equal Opportunity Advisor (EOA)?
Get with your Installation EOA for guidance.