Mission

The 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson builds and maintains combat ready expeditionary forces necessary to fight and win in complex environments as members of a Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental, and Multinational (JIIM) team or as a Mission Command Element (MCE); provides first class support to Soldiers, Airmen, Civilians, and Families; and enable unified action with community, state, and interagency partners to accomplish all assigned missions.

Are you READY?

  • R: be RESPECTFUL of others

    WE NEED TO BE RESPECTFUL! Inclusion of all unit members builds esprit de corps on any team. How we treat each other and our subordinates sets the tone for our formations. Do not tolerate inappropriate treatment of others, comments or jokes, or demeaning and degrading actions or practices inside your formations. Help build our Team of Teams.

    The best teams are the ones that maximize the differences and unique skills that each member brings to the organization. Harassment, sexual assault and hazing are fratricide in our formations. We must set the tone and hold our Troopers accountable. We come from all over the United States, and we must realize that not everyone grew up with the same values, so we must model and reinforce our unit and Army values to continue to build our team.

    We must not tolerate discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual assault. We will stand next to those Americans who have volunteered to serve! Are you RESPECTFUL . do you treat others as you want to be treated? Are you READY?

  • E: be EXPERTS

    WE NEED TO BE EXPERTS! On Oct. 3, 2009, 53 Ivy Soldiers of Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, awoke to an attack by 300 Taliban fighters on their combat outpost. The enemy had infiltrated and occupied the high ground on all four sides of the outpost. On that day, 53 Ivy Soldiers fought for their lives, they fought for each other and they fought to survive. Through coordinated efforts of the leaders and Soldiers on the ground, the resolve of AH-64 pilots from Forward Operating Base (FOB) Bostick and numerous sorties of Air Force aircraft, the team repelled the attack killing more than 150 Taliban fighters. Ivy Soldiers Staff Sgt. Clint Romesha and Staff Sgt. Ty Carter demonstrated their expertise that day. Close-quarters marksmanship, distance engagements with sniper rifles, calling for fire, and rendering aid to wounded comrades, these two NCOs helped turn the tide and prevent the outpost from being overrun.

    Like Romesha and Carter, we must be disciplined to train to master the skills of our profession. Do you want to be in a fighting position with someone that shoots 26 out of 40 or do you want a battle buddy who has trained at his or her craft to be an EXPERT, who can hit every target that they aim at as if it was second nature? We all have to work to be EXPERTS, and we all must challenge our teammates to do the same.

    EXPERTS aren't born, they're made through repetition and disciplined work. People don't become doctors or professional athletes through luck, they work to master those professions and we must do the same.

    Every Soldier should be fit, an EXPERT with their weapon and most importantly an EXPERT in their specialty. The READY Range is available Tuesday to Thursday of each week for Soldiers to continue to work on mastering the skills of marksmanship.

    Is okay good enough for you, or will you make yourself an EXPERT? Will you expect the same from your teammates, when your life may depend on their expertise? Are you an EXPERT? Are you READY?

  • A: be an ATHLETE

    WE NEED TO BE WARRIOR ATHLETES! Since 1917 Ivy Soldiers have been placed in the most demanding physical situations from the beaches of Normandy, to the sweltering jungles of Vietnam, to the mountainous terrain of the Hindu Kush, and every time they accomplished their mission. Today we are expected to move just as far and just as fast under even heavier loads to close with and destroy the enemies of our country. There’s no doubt that being a Soldier is among the most physically demanding professions and we must be READY to execute.

    Becoming a Warrior ATHLETE can’t be done overnight, and we must use every day to improve ourselves. We have to train hard, but we must also train smart and take advantage of all of the advances in fitness and nutrition we have available on Fort Carson. We are blessed to train “at altitude” — athletes from around the world pay to train here in Colorado and we get this awesome environment for free! To perform at our peak we also have to fuel our fitness with proper nutrition. Hot dogs and energy drinks are not served at the Olympic Training Center and the consequences of losing in our profession are significantly higher. The division is working to turn our dining facilities (DFACs) into Warrior Restaurants, where you can get the balanced nutrients needed to fuel peak performance. But in the end, it’s up to YOU! Strive every day to make yourself physically better with rigorous exercise and smart nutritional choices.

    Hold your teammates accountable because ultimately your life may depend on their fitness. You have a choice every day. Will you be better today than you were yesterday? Are you an ATHLETE? Are you READY?

  • D: be DISCIPLINED and enforce Army standards

    WE NEED TO BE DISCIPLINED! Discipline is the bedrock of our profession. Disciplined Soldiers create disciplined units. Units that are commonly referred to as the best are typically the ones that are dedicated to being EXPERTS in the execution of the basic tasks. Their disciplined approach is replicated by Soldiers who possess the DISCIPLINE to take the often harder path. The courage to choose the right path, even - and quite often when - it's harder, more uncomfortable, less popular and at times dangerous, is the bedrock of the best units. For leaders this also means a DISCIPLINED approach to training management. We must efficiently plan and resource our training, ensure that our leaders are certified to conduct the training and most importantly provide predictability to our Troopers.

    A simple quote summarizes: "It's one thing to know the path; it's another thing to walk the path." Good units know the path; great units choose to walk that path. They do it by holding themselves accountable and placing their trust in each other. They train to be EXPERTS and know that those on their left and right will be there for them.

    Do you have the DISCIPLINE to train to be an EXPERT, an ATHLETE, and a RESPECTFUL teammate? Will you hold your teammates accountable to make sure that they are also DISCIPLINED? Are you DISCIPLINED? Are you READY?

  • Y: It's up to YOU. Take initiative -- make a difference and be accountable.

    Our 100-year history is filled with stories of brave Ivy Soldiers who, when facing a critical juncture in the heat of battle, chose to be there for their comrades. Twenty of our 25 Medal of Honor recipients were junior officers . captain and below or staff sergeant and below. On the day their comrades needed them, they were READY because they had prepared every day in training. They seized the initiative to turn the tide in battle. Their individual efforts made the difference.

    YOU make the difference! Being READY is a call to all of us: Soldiers, Family members, community leaders and community members. It is demonstrated in the choices we make, the efforts we support and the responsibilities we embrace.

    Are YOU willing to walk the difficult path or merely acknowledge it? Seize every opportunity to make yourself, your team, your unit and your Family better. Are you READY?

Leadership

4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson

  • Maj. Gen. Randy A. George, Commanding General

    Biography

    Maj. Gen. Randy A. George assumed command of 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson Aug. 24, 2017.

    He enlisted in the Army in 1982 from Alden, Iowa, and was commissioned an infantry officer in 1988. His initial assignment was with 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky where he served as a platoon leader, company executive officer (Operation Desert Shield/Storm), scout platoon leader (3rd Battalion, 327th Infantry), aide-de-camp and battalion S3-Air (3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry).

    Following the Armor Officer Advance Course at Fort Knox, Kentucky, George served in 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, at Fort Carson as an assistant brigade S3 and commanded Charlie Company and Headquarters and Headquarters Company in 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry. George attended Command and General Staff College (CGSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Following CGSC, George served as the battalion executive officer for 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry and brigade executive officer for 173rd Airborne Brigade in Vicenza, Italy.

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom, George served as the deputy brigade commander for 173rd Airborne in Kirkuk, Iraq (2003-2004). He then served as the commander for the 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry “Leader Rakkasans” in Bayji, Iraq (2005-2006) and as a member of the Multi-National Commander-Iraq Initiatives group in Bagdad, Iraq (2007).

    During Operation Enduring Freedom, George served as the commander of 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division (2009-2010).

    After brigade command, George served as a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City, New York, then as the chief of plans in Pakistan-Afghanistan Coordination Cell on the Joint Staff followed by an assignment as an executive officer for the vice chief of staff of the Army and CENTCOM commander at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

    George served as the deputy commanding general (Maneuver) for 4th Infantry Division at Fort Carson before assuming his duties as the director, Force Management, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 United States Army, Washington D.C. and then later as the deputy director for Regional Operations and Global Force Management (J-35), the Joint Staff.

    George earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from U.S. Military Academy, Master’s Degree in Economics from Colorado School of Mines, and a Master’s in International Security Studies from Naval War College.

    R: be RESPECTFUL of others (Live by the Golden Rule).
    E: be EXPERTS in your craft.
    A: be an ATHLETE.
    D: be DISCIPLINED and enforce Army standards.
    Y: it’s up to YOU. Take initiative- make a difference and be accountable.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. T.J. Holland

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. T.J. Holland enlisted as an infantryman in the United States Army Nov. 9, 1994, in Lancaster, Ohio. He attended Infantry One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. He has served in every leadership position in the infantry from team leader to command sergeant major.

    His previous assignments include 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Airborne), 173rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, Vicenza, Italy; 5th Ranger Training Battalion, Dahlonega, Georgia; 1st Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, Rose Barracks, Germany; United States Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas; United States Army Parachute Team “Golden Knights,” Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and the 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, and the Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Hohenfels, Germany. His deployments include Joint Task Force Liberia, Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF I; and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF VI and OEF X-XI).

    His military schools and education consist of Basic Leader Course, Advanced Leader Course, Senior Leader Course, First Sergeants Course, United States Army Sergeants Major Course, Army Force Management Course, Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officers Course, Airborne School, Air Assault School, Ranger School, Jumpmaster School, Tactics Certification Course, Total Army Instructor Training, Pathfinder School and Mountain Warfare School. He holds an Associate in Arts in General Studies, a Bachelor of Science in Sports and Health Sciences from the American Military University, and a Master of Business Administration in Leadership from Excelsior College, and a Graduates Certificate in Mediation.

    His awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with “V” device, Bronze Star Medal with one oak leaf cluster, Meritorious Service Medal with one oak leaf cluster; Army Commendation Medal with four oak leaf clusters; Joint Service Achievement Medal; Army Achievement Medal with four oak leaf clusters, Joint Meritorious Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Citation with one oak leaf cluster, Army Superior Unit Award, Army Good Conduct Medal with seven knots, National Defense Service Medal with Service Stat, Kosovo Campaign Medal with Service Star, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Iraqi Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon (five awards), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (seven awards), Multi-National Forces and Observer Medal, NATO Medal (two awards), Ranger Tab, Combat Infantryman’s Badge, Expert Infantryman’s Badge, Master Parachutists Badge, Air Assault Badge, Pathfinder Badge and several foreign parachutist badges. He is also a Sergeant Morales Club inductee.

  • Brig. Gen. William L. Thigpen, Deputy Commanding General

    Biography

    Brig. Gen. William L. Thigpen became deputy commanding general, 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson, Aug. 4, 2017. A native of Hampton, Virginia, Thigpen graduated from Virginia State University in 1992 with a Bachelor’s degree in public administration and was commissioned as an armor officer in the U.S. Army.

    Prior to his current assignment, Thigpen served at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., as a chief of staff of the Army’s senior fellow. He has commanded United States Army formations at every level from company through brigade, and prior to his fellowship, he commanded the 316th Cavalry Brigade at Fort Benning, Georgia. He is a combat veteran of campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. His staff assignments include serving as the aide-de-camp to the vice chief of staff of the Army.

    He is a graduate of the National War College, where he earned a Master’s degree in National Security and Strategic Studies. He holds a second Master’s degree in Business from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

  • Col. Kevin D. Admiral, Deputy Commander (Maneuver)

    Biography

    Col. Kevin D. Admiral graduated from the University of Kansas in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Cellular Biology and was commissioned an Armor officer.

    Most recently, he served as the executive officer to the commander of the U.N. Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces Korea from July 2017 to July 2018.

    His previous assignments include tank platoon leader and company executive officer in 1st Battalion, 32nd Armored Regiment, Fort Lewis, Washington; battalion S4, Company A commander and Headquarters Company commander, 1st Battalion, 72nd Armored Regiment, at Camp Casey, Korea; tank company/cavalry troop observer-controller at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California; small group instructor for the Armor Captain's Career Course at Fort Knox, Kentucky; battalion S3 and executive officer of 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, and deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom 05-07; deputy chief of Plans/G5 for the 4th Infantry Division and Multi-National Division-Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09; aide-de-camp to the 36th Army chief of staff in Washington, D.C.; battalion commander, 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment (SBCT), at Fort Bliss and served in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom 12-13; 1st Armored Division deputy chief of staff and chief of staff; and 76th Regimental Commander, 3rd Cavalry Regiment (SBCT) at Fort Hood, Texas and in Afghanistan in support Operation Resolute Support and Freedom's Sentinel. Admiral's education includes the Armor Basic and Advanced Courses; the Cavalry Leaders' Course; the Joint Advanced Warfighting School, from which he received a Master of Science in Campaign Planning and Strategy; and the Royal College of Defence Studies in London, where he was a Senior Service College Fellow.

    Admiral's awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal (with three oak leaf clusters), Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal (with six oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal (with three oak leaf clusters), Afghanistan Campaign Medal (with campaign star), Iraq Campaign Medal (with four campaign stars), Overseas Service Ribbon (with roman numeral six), the Combat Action Badge, Parachutist Badge and Army Staff Identification Badge.

  • Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Ryan, Deputy Commander (Support)

    Biography

    Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Ryan became the deputy commander (support), 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson, Aug. 16, 2018. A native of Pearl River, New York, Ryan graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1991 and was commissioned as an infantry officer.

    Prior to his assignment with the 4th Inf. Div., Ryan served as the executive officer to the Chief of Staff of the Army. He has served as the commander of the 2nd Brigade Combat, 82nd Airborne Division, multiple assignments with the 75th Ranger Regiment to include commanding the Regimental Special Troops Battalion, and as the battalion commander of the 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). He has multiple combat deployments to both Iraq and Afghanistan. Ryan is a graduate of the Infantry Officer's Basic and Advanced Courses, the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and the Army War College where he served as a fellow at Columbia University in New York. He holds a Bachelor of Science in engineering physics from the USMA and a Master of Arts in management from Webster University.

    His awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit third award, Bronze Star Medal fourth award, Meritorious Service Medal fourth award, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal for Valor, Army Commendation Medal third award, Army Achievement Medal fourth award, Combat Infantryman Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, Master Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Ranger Tab and the Army Staff Identification Badge.

  • Col. Thomas M. Feltey, Chief of Staff

    Col. Thomas M. Feltey enlisted in the New Jersey Army National Guard in February 1988 and served as an infantryman in Company C, 2nd Battalion, 113th Infantry (Mechanized), 50th Armored Division. He graduated from Rutgers University in 1993 as a distinguished military graduate and was commissioned a lieutenant of Armor.

    Most recently, Feltey served as the commander of the 316th Cavalry Brigade, Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, Georgia, from July 2016 to June 2018.

    His previous assignments include senior adviser to the Ministry of Peshmerga, and Northern Affairs for the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq at the U.S. Consulate General Erbil, Iraq, from July 2015 to June 2016 in support of Operation Inherent Resolve; commander, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry, 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, with duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Spin Boldak, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan (2011-2014); deputy assistant chief of staff G35 in the NATO Allied Rapid Reaction Corps in Rheindahlen, Germany, and Gloucester, England, with duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom as the Regional Command East/Capital regional plans team leader, and later deputy CJ35 of the ISAF Joint Command (2009-2011); squadron operations and executive officer, 3rd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas, with duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Mosul, Iraq (2006-2009); Maneuver Captains’ Career Course small group instructor and chief of the Commanding General’s Planning Group for the U.S. Armor Center, Fort Knox, Kentucky, with duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom as an Afghan Army Reconnaissance Platoon adviser/trainer (2002-2005); Cavalry and Headquarters Troop commander, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in Schweinfurt, Germany, (1998-2002); tank platoon leader and battalion scout platoon leader in the 1st Battalion, 66th Armor Regiment, and later as a scout platoon leader in the Brigade Recon Troop, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas, with duty in support of Operation Sea Signal, Guantanamo, Cuba (1994-1997).

    Feltey’s education includes the Armor Basic and Advanced Courses, the Scout Platoon Leaders’ Course, the Cavalry Leaders’ Course, the Naval College of Command and Staff, the Maritime School of Advanced Military Studies and the Joint Advanced Warfighting School. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Rutgers University, a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Navy War College and a Master of Science Degree in Campaign Planning and Strategic Studies from the Joint Forces Staff College of the National Defense University.

    His awards and decorations include the Valorous Unit Award, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal second award, Defense Meritorious Service Medal second award, Meritorious Service Medal fifth award, the Combat Action Badge, Parachutist Badge and Canadian Parachutist Badge. Feltey is a recipient of the Order of Saint George (Silver) and the Order of Saint Maurice (Legionnaire). Additionally, he is a distinguished member of the 23rd Infantry Regiment.

  • Division History

    The 4th Infantry Division is the preeminent team of combat-focused Soldiers, Families, and supporting community members achieving excellence in the support of each other and the Army’s mission.

    As the Army’s only balanced division with the combination of armor, light, and Stryker infantry, the 4th Inf. Div. is the most versatile division in the United States Army providing options to joint force commanders consistent with today’s Army Operating Concept.

    The 4th Inf. Div. is trained and ready to fight and win; Iron Horse Soldiers and civilians are certified, agile, and adaptive professionals of character committed to sustaining readiness and caring for Families and communities.

    In keeping with the rich history and service to the community of the Mountain Post, the 4th Inf. Div. is proud to be the face of Fort Carson and a loyal partner with the community. Working together, the 4th Inf. Div. and Fort Carson build and maintain combat-ready expeditionary forces necessary to fight and win in complex environments as members of joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational teams and as a mission command element.

    The “Iron Horse” Division and Fort Carson provide first class support to Soldiers, Airmen, civilians, and Families; and enable unified action with community, state, and interagency partners to accomplish all assigned missions.

    On December 10, 1917, the same year that America entered World War I, the 4th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, was organized at Camp Greene, North Carolina to begin its long tradition of service to the Nation. Filled with draftees, the 4th Div., whose insignia had been adopted by its first commanding general, Major General George H. Cameron, became known as the “Ivy” Division. Its insignia consisted of four green ivy leaves on a khaki background. The division also derived its numerical designation from the Roman numeral IV; hence the nickname, “Ivy” Division. The division’s motto, “Steadfast and Loyal,” has described the Iron Horse Soldier for nearly 100 years. On December 10, 1917, the same year that America entered World War I, the 4th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, was organized at Camp Greene, North Carolina to begin its long tradition of service to the Nation. Filled with draftees, the 4th Div., whose insignia had been adopted by its first commanding general, Major General George H. Cameron, became known as the “Ivy” Division. Its insignia consisted of four green ivy leaves on a khaki background. The division also derived its numerical designation from the Roman numeral IV; hence the nickname, “Ivy” Division. The division’s motto, “Steadfast and Loyal,” has described the Iron Horse Soldier for nearly 100 years.

    By June 1918, the entire division had arrived in France, and before entering combat in July for the Aisne-Marne Offensive, the 4th fought with distinction across France and received great praise for their heroic efforts during St. Mariel and the Muese-Argonne campaigns. With the Armistice signed on Nov. 11, the division moved to serve both the French and British sectors as well as all Corps in the American sector and was the first to crack the Hindenburg Line.

    The 4th Infantry Division was reactivated in June 1940 and began training immediately for war. Sent to England in January 1944 for amphibious training prior to D-Day, the Ivy Division was first ashore, landing at Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. After a successful landing and breakout from Normandy, the 4th pushed into France and liberated Paris. The division then moved to Luxembourg where the 4th Inf. Div. became the first U.S. Soldiers to breach the Siegfried line and enter Germany. The 4th moved north to face the enemy in the bloody Hurtgen Forest and after weeks of brutal combat returned to Luxembourg for action in the Battle of the Bulge. The 4th Inf. Div. halted the enemy advance in December, gained the offensive and attacked across the Rhine and into eastern Germany during the spring of 1945.

    The Fighting Fourth was again called into action in the fall of 1965 and sent to Vietnam. The division was given a large area of the Central Highlands to control and a base camp was soon established at Pleiku. During the next four years, the 4th Inf. Div. engaged the enemy in brutal combat, conducting search and destroy missions and constant patrols to defend their assigned territory. They eliminated enemy incursions moving from the Ho Chi Minh Trail thru Cambodia and Laos. When the division departed Vietnam in late 1970, it had earned 11 campaign streamers and 12 Soldiers had earned the Medal of Honor.

    The 4th Inf. Div. returned to combat in 2003 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and would deploy multiple times during the next eight years. After arriving in April 2003, the division established Task Force Iron Horse at Tikrit and engaged the enemy north of Baghdad. In December 2003, the 4th along with special operations forces captured Saddam Hussein. The 4th Inf. Div. Headquarters returned in both 2005 and 2007 to command Multi-National Division-Baghdad and the division’s brigade combat teams also made multiple deployments in support of the war. During their service in Iraq, Iron Horse Soldiers would balance combat in July for the Aisne-Marne Offensive, the 4th fought with distinction across France and received great praise for their heroic efforts during St. Mariel and the Muese-Argonne campaigns. With the Armistice signed on Nov. 11, the division moved to serve both the French and British sectors as well as all Corps in the American sector and was the first to crack the Hindenburg Line. The 4th Infantry Division was reactivated in June 1940 and began training immediately for war. Sent to England in January 1944 for amphibious training prior to D-Day, the Ivy Division was first ashore, landing at Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. After a successful landing and breakout from Normandy, the 4th pushed into France and liberated Paris. The division then moved to Luxembourg where the 4th Inf. Div. became the first U.S. Soldiers to breach the Siegfried line and enter Germany. The 4th moved north to face the enemy in the bloody Hurtgen Forest and after weeks of brutal combat returned to Luxembourg for action in the Battle of the Bulge. The 4th Inf. Div. halted the enemy advance in December, gained the offensive and attacked across the Rhine and into eastern Germany during the spring of 1945. The Fighting Fourth was again called into action in the fall of 1965 and sent to Vietnam. The division was given a large area of the Central Highlands to control and a base camp was soon established at Pleiku. During the next four years, the 4th Inf. Div. engaged the enemy in brutal combat, conducting search and destroy missions and constant patrols to defend their assigned territory. They eliminated enemy incursions moving from the Ho Chi Minh Trail thru Cambodia and Laos. When the division departed Vietnam in late 1970, it had earned 11 campaign streamers and 12 Soldiers had earned the Medal of Honor. The 4th Inf. Div. returned to combat in 2003 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and would deploy multiple times during the next eight years. After arriving in April 2003, the division established Task Force Iron Horse at Tikrit and engaged the enemy north of Baghdad. In December 2003, the 4th along with special operations forces captured Saddam Hussein. The 4th Inf. Div. Headquarters returned in both 2005 and 2007 to command Multi-National Division-Baghdad and the division’s brigade combat teams also made multiple deployments in support of the war. During their service in Iraq, Iron Horse Soldiers would balance aggressive operations to eliminate threats with massive rebuilding projects and sophisticated training programs. The Iron Horse Division deployed, serving as the command for MND-North in support of Operation New Dawn, in 2010.

    The Al Qaeda attacks of September 11, 2001 resulted in a swift and unified action to destroy those responsible. The U.S. Army invaded Afghanistan in 2001 to search for and destroy al Qaeda, its sympathizers and its leader Osama Bin Laden. The action became known as Operation Enduring Freedom and focused on eliminating the Taliban organization which supported al Qaeda and practiced domestic terrorism against the people of Afghanistan. As the war evolved U.S. and NATO forces increased in number to also provide necessary security training and infrastructure development for a free and democratic Afghanistan.

    The Iron Horse Division cased its colors again, June 24, 2013, symbolizing the beginning of the Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion’s one-year deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The division deployed part of its headquarters to support NATO’s International Security Assistance Force Regional Command-South in its mission to support and enable Afghanistan’s National Security Forces to conduct security operations and create the necessary conditions to promote economic development and governance in the Kandahar, Zabul, Uruzgan and Daykundi provinces.

    After returning from their deployment to Regional Command-South, Afghanistan, the 4th Inf. Div. received the Army’s Regionally Allocated Forces mission in Europe. Arriving in Europe Feb. 13, 2015, the 4th Inf. Div. Mission Command Element serves as an intermediate headquarters for U.S. Army Europe, operating in support of Atlantic Resolve.

    The 4th Inf. Div. headquarters was the first division-level headquarters to deploy to Europe as part of the regionally allocated forces concept. The MCE is a headquarters element tailored to provide mission command for all U.S. ground forces participating in Atlantic Resolve, and oversees continuous, enhanced multinational training and security cooperation activities with allies and partners in Eastern Europe, to include countries of Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Germany.

    The 4th Inf. Div. has earned 22 campaign streamers for participation in World War I, World War II, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Since World War I, 25 Soldiers were awarded the nation’s highest honor, the Medal of Honor. Staff Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha and Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter are two recent Soldiers to receive the nation’s highest military award for extraordinary gallantry and selfless actions during the Battle of Kamdesh at Combat Outpost Keating, Afghanistan, on Oct. 3, 2009. Capt. Florent A. Groberg was the latest Iron Horse Soldier to receive the Medal of Honor from the President, Nov. 12, 2015.

    The Iron Horse Division remains regionally engaged supporting multiple operations and mission sets the world round, from North America to Europe, Afghanistan and abroad. 4th Inf. Div. Soldiers demonstrate unparalleled competence, character and agility in their training and their mission. Iron Horse Soldiers are fit, disciplined and trained to the 4th Inf. Div. fundamentals – prepared to fight and win, whenever and wherever called.

  • 4th Infantry Division March

    4th Infantry Division March

    Steadfast and loyal,
    We're fit to fight!
    The nation's finest Soldiers,
    Keep liberty's light.
    Our Soldiers roar for freedom,
    We're fit for any test.
    The mighty 4th Division ...
    America's best!

  • 4th Infantry Division Units

    4th Infantry Division –

    • Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHBN) –
    DIVARTY –
    1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team –
    • 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment
    • 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment
    • 2nd Battalion, 12th Field Artillery Regiment
    • 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment
    • 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment
    • 4th Brigade Support Battalion
    • 299th Brigade Engineer Battalion
    2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team –
    • 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment
    • 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment
    • 2nd Battalion, 12th Field Artillery Regiment
    • 2nd Battalion, 77th Infantry Regiment
    • 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment
    • 52nd Brigade Engineer Battalion
    • 704th Brigade Support Battalion
    3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team –
    • 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment
    • 1st Battalion, 66th Armor Regiment
    • 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment
    • 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment
    • 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment
    • 588th Brigade Engineer Battalion
    • 64th Brigade Support Battalion
    4th Combat Aviation Brigade –
    • 6th Attack Reconnaissance Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment
    • 404th Aviation Support Battalion
    • 4th Aviation Regiment
      • 2nd General Support Aviation Battalion
      • 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion
      • 4th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion
    4th Sustainment Brigade -
    • 68th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion
    • 4th Special Troops Battalion

1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team (1SBCT)

  • Col. Monté Rone, Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Monté Rone assumed command of 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Aug. 30, 2017. He received his commission as an infantry officer following graduation from Eastern Michigan University in 1995. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced courses, Airborne School, Ranger School, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and the U.S. Army War College.

    Prior to assuming command of 1st SBCT, Rone served as the J3 operations director for Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa, the G3 operations officer for the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss, Texas, and he commanded 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Other command assignments include tours as the commander, Company B and Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division.

    Rone’s previous non-command assignments include service as an Infantry Branch assignment officer, battalion operations officer, brigade operations officer, and brigade executive officer.

    Rone holds a Master’s of Policy Management degree from Georgetown University, a Master’s in Strategic Studies from the U.S. Army War College, and a Bachelor’s of Business Administration degree with a focus in accounting and auditing from Eastern Michigan University. His awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom campaign medals, the Senior Parachutist Badge, the Aviation Crew Members Badge, the Combat and Expert Infantryman badges, and the Ranger Tab.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Charles W. Tennant

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Charles W. Tennant enlisted in the United States Army in August 1989. He received his Basic and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. During his 27 years of service, Tennant has held numerous leadership positions including: squad leader, platoon sergeant, first sergeant and command sergeant major.

    His previous assignments include 4th Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, Fort Ord, California; 4th Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis, Washington; Joint Security Area Panmonjom, Demilitarized Zone, Korea; 6th Ranger Training Battalion, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida; Area Support Group, Kuwait; 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis; and 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson.

    Throughout his career, Tennant continued to further his military education and training. He completed every Noncommissioned Officer Education System course, culminating in and graduating from Class 39(NR) of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. His other military education includes Ranger School, Basic Airborne School, Air Assault School, Nuclear Biological Chemical Officer Course and Equal Opportunity Leaders Course, and he is in the final stages of earning a Bachelor’s degree in Human Resources Management.

    Tennant’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal with five oak leaf clusters, the Army Achievement Medal with five oak leaf clusters, Good Conduct Medal – Eighth Award, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with star, Iraq Campaign medal with two stars, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korea Defense Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon with numeral 3, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon with numeral 8, United Nations Medal, NATO Medal, Joint Meritorious Unit Award, Valorous Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Ranger Tab, Combat Infantryman Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, U.S. Army Parachutist Badge, German Parachutist Badge, and the Air Assault Badge. He is a member of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club, and is a recipient of the Aubrey “Red” Newman Award, the St. Maurice Medallion (Bronze), the Honorable Order of Saint Barbara, the Noble Patron of Armor Award, and holds both Gold and Silver Spurs.

  • Unit History

    The 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, is comprised of seven subordinate units including the 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment; 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment; 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 12th Field Artillery Regiment; 299th Brigade Engineer Battalion; and the 4th Brigade Support Battalion.

    The “Raider” Brigade was constituted Nov. 19, 1917, in the Regular Army as Headquarters Troop, 4th Infantry Division. The unit participated in World War I and was involved in numerous campaigns including Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne and Lorraine. It reorganized July 6, 1942, as Headquarters Company, 4th Infantry Division, in preparation for the initial assault into Normandy. Following the end of World War II, the unit was inactivated March 12, 1946, at Camp Butner, North Carolina. The Raider Brigade served in Vietnam operating in numerous operations and counteroffensives.

    On Oct. 15, 1995, the brigade inactivated at Fort Carson, Colorado, but was reactivated at Fort Hood, Texas, Jan. 16, 1996. In March 2003, the Raider Brigade deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. On Dec. 13, 2003, 600 Raider Brigade Soldiers, along with Special Operations Forces, launched Operation Red Dawn, which resulted in capturing the former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. The Raider Brigade was reorganized and redesignated as the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, in 2004. The Raider Brigade returned to Iraq in January 2006 fulfilling the second deployed rotation in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    The Raider Brigade deployed for a third time in March 2008, to southern Baghdad during the peak of sectarian violence. After successful provincial elections in January 2009, the Raider Brigade returned to Fort Hood in March 2010. In the summer of 2009, the Raider Brigade relocated from Fort Hood, Texas, to Fort Carson, Colorado. In September 2009, the brigade received orders as the first heavy brigade combat team to deploy to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The brigade deployed July 2010 and operated in two regional commands in the south and west of Afghanistan. Combined Task Force Raider fought and trained side by side with the Afghan National Security Forces and International Security Assistance Forces partners from Herat and Farah to Kandahar and Arghandab. The Raider Brigade deployed February 2013 in support of Operation Spartan Shield in Kuwait. The majority of the unit was tasked as theater reserve and based out of Kuwait, while elements of the brigade operated with Security Forces North and South. The unit provided joint security and training operations between the Kuwaiti military forces as well as the Jordanian military.

    In March 2014, the Raider Brigade began its conversion from an Armored Brigade to a Stryker Brigade Combat Team, trading in its M1 Abrams tanks and Bradley Infantry Fighting vehicles for the Stryker combat vehicles. The 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team combines the capacity for rapid deployment with survivability and tactical mobility, enabling Soldiers to maneuver within the close confines of urban terrain, provide protection in open terrain, and transport infantry quickly to critical battlefield positions. Throughout 2015 and 2016, the Raider Brigade tested the Stryker combat vehicle through numerous training exercises. In 2017 and 2018, rotations to the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and deployed in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel and Resolute Support Mission.

    The brigade earned numerous campaign participation credits, including Meuse-Argonne during World War I; Tet Counteroffensive in Vietnam; Pleiku Province in Korea, and Iraqi Governance as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom to name a few. A few of its more prestigious decorations include two Presidential Unit Citations, the Valorous Unit Award, the Army superior unit award, the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, and the Belgian Fourragere.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (2IBCT)

  • Col. Dave Zinn, Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Dave Zinn took command of 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, June 30, 2017.

    He was commissioned as an armor officer upon graduation from the United States Military Academy in 1995. His military education includes Armor Officer Basic Course, Armor Officer Advanced Course, Combined Arms and Services Staff School, Command and General Staff College, Scout Platoon Leader Course, Airborne School, Ranger School, and Jumpmaster School. He also earned a Master’s degree from the University of Chicago.

    His military assignments include 3rd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson as a tank platoon leader, scout platoon leader, and troop executive officer; 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas as the brigade plans officer and brigade reconnaissance troop commander; 3rd Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, Fort Hood as the Bravo Company commander; staff and faculty, United States Military Academy; 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, as the squadron executive officer; 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg as the brigade executive officer; III Corps, Fort Hood, as the aide-de-camp to the corps commander; Training and Doctrine Command, Fort Eustis, Virginia, as the aide-de-camp to the commanding general; 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment as the squadron commander; and Pentagon, Virginia, as the military assistant to the secretary of the Army. He recently completed a National Security Affairs Fellowship at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

    Zinn served three tours in Iraq, as a troop commander, squadron executive officer and brigade executive officer, and aide-de-camp to the corps commander; in Ba’qubah, eastern Baghdad, Diyala Province, and Mada’in Province. In 2014, he participated in Exercise Foal Eagle in South Korea and Exercise Balikatan in the Philippines.

    His military awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with oak leaf cluster, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (6th Award), Army Commendation Medal (3rd Award), numerous campaign and service medals, and the Combat Action Badge.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Anton J. Hillig

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Anton J. Hillig was born and raised in Bismarck, North Dakota and enlisted as a cavalry scout in the United States Army in June 1993. He conducted One Unit Station Training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. During his 23-plus years of service, Hillig has held numerous leadership positions which include: squad leader, section sergeant, platoon sergeant, first sergeant, squadron operations sergeant major, and battalion command sergeant major.

    His previous assignments include: 1st Squadron, 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Polk, Louisiana; 2nd Battalion 72nd Armor Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Camp Casey, Korea; 1st Battalion, 32nd Armor Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington; 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson; 5th Squadron 15th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Knox; 6th Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Georgia; Joint Readiness Training Center, Task Force Three, Fort Polk; 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas; Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2-1 Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley; 1st Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment, 4th Infantry Division.

    Hillig has completed all Noncommissioned Officer Education System courses, culminating with graduating in Class 63 U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Joint Fire Power Training Course, Cavalry Leader Course and Scout Leader Course. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Troy University.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (two oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (six oak leaf clusters), Army Achievement Medal (five oak leaf clusters), Good Conduct Medal – seventh award, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal with three bronze stars, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon with numeral 4, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon with numeral 4, NATO Medal, Valorous Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, Parachutist Badge, Pathfinder Badge, Air Assault Badge, Combat Action Badge, and the Latvian Parachutist Badge. Hillig has been inducted into the Order of Saint George, the Order of Saint Maurice and awarded the General Aubrey Red Newman Award.

  • Connect With Us

    24/7 Staff Duty - 719-503-4009

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    Contact Us

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  • Events

    Walk to Kosovo/Afghanistan



    The Walk to Kosovo/Afghanistan (W2KA) is an event and opportunity for Families and members of the rear detachment to stay active and communicate to those forward that they are thinking of them and going an extra mile, or 7,380+ miles, to cover the distance from Fort Carson to Kosovo and Afghanistan, where 2nd IBCT has Soldiers.

    The W2KA helps Families meet face to face and stay connected through a support system geared toward fitness and enjoying Iron Horse Park inside the installation.

    Upcoming events are scheduled at Iron Horse Park at 9 a.m. Sept. 21 and Oct. 19. Family, friends and pets are invited and allowed to add miles, even on days we do not host the W2KA. For more information call 719-503-4090 or email angela.m.dimattia.mil@mail.mil.

    Reintegration Workshop

    Reintegration Workshop Oct. 24 A Reintegration Workshop will be held Oct. 24 from 5-8:30 p.m. at the Elkhorn Conference Center, 1725 Woodfill Road. Child care and dinner will be provided. Register for the workshop at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Oct20182BCTReint. Social starts at 5:30 p.m. and dinner begins at 6 p.m.

    Child drop off starts at 5 p.m. at building 6060, 6060 Coleman St. For more information on Child and Youth Services child care visit https://carson.armymwr.com/programs/special-event-childcare-information. Children must be registered with CYS and spots reserved by Oct. 17.

  • Units

  • News

  • Unit History

    The "Warhorse" Brigade, Fourth Infantry Division (Mechanized) was constituted Nov. 19, 1917, in the Regular Army as Headquarters, Seventh Infantry Brigade, an element of the Fourth Division. It was then organized in December 1917 at Camp Greene, North Carolina.

    The brigade served valiantly during World War I and earned battlefield streamers for its participation in the Aisne-Marne, Saint Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne-1918 and Lorraine-1918 campaigns.

    The unit was reorganized and redesignated in March 1921 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Infantry Brigade. The unit was inactivated Sept. 21, 1921, at Camp Lewis, Washington. It was redesignated March 23, 1925, as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Brigade, and relieved Aug. 15, 1927, from assignment to the 4th Division and assigned to the 7th Division. It was relieved Oct. 1, 1933, from assignment to the 7th Division and assigned to the 4th Division. It was redesignated Aug. 24, 1936, as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Infantry Brigade, and disbanded Oct. 16, 1939.

    With tensions rising in the Republic of Vietnam, the brigade was reconstituted Aug. 21, 1963, in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Second Brigade, Fourth Infantry Division, and activated Oct. 1, 1963, at Fort Lewis, Washington. During the Vietnam War, the Second Brigade received battlefield streamers for participation in 11 combat campaigns.

    After the Vietnam War, the brigade fought the rest of the Cold War while stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado, until it was inactivated in 1989. Subsequently reactivated Dec. 15, 1995, at Fort Hood, Texas, the brigade led the Army's Force XXI experimentation and validation, shaping the force of the 21st Century.

    The Warhorse Brigade has participated in many operations of the War On Terror, fighting to invade and secure Iraq as well as Afghanistan. In March 2003, the 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, deployed to the Middle East in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In late 2006, the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, moved from Fort Hood, Texas, to Fort Carson, Colorado.

    In 2003-2004, 2005-2007 and 2008-2010 the brigade deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Meanwhile, 4th Brigade or "The Mountain Warrior" Brigade deployed in 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014 and 2016 to various regions of Afghanistan to further bring stability to the region. In 2015, the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, was realigned under the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The brigade's most recent deployment was to Afghanistan in 2018 where War Horse Soldiers served on missions in Kandahar, Bagram, Dwyer and Tarin Kowt in support of the Resolute Support Mission to train, advise and assist Afghan National Defense Security Forces.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team (3ABCT)

  • Col. Michael J. Simmering, Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Michael J. Simmering assumed command of 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team July 25, 2017. He was commissioned as an Armor Officer in May 1993 following graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

    His previous tours include deputy commander/chief of staff for the Joint Readiness Training Center and Fort Polk, Louisiana (2016-2017); commander, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, Fort Benning, Georgia (2015-2016); deputy command center director, United States Northern Command (2014-2015); division G3, 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson (2012-2013); commander, 1st Combined Arms Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division (2009-2012) with duty in the Arghandab Valley, Khandahar Province, Afghanistan (2011-2012); deputy chief of staff, 4th Infantry Division (2008-2009); regimental executive officer, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR), Fort Hood, Texas (2007-2008) with duty in Mosul, Iraq (2007); regimental S3 (Operations), 3rd ACR, Fort Carson and later at Fort Hood, Texas (2006-2007); S3 (Operations), 2nd Squadron, 3rd ACR, Fort Carson (2005-2006) with duty in Tal Afar, Iraq (2005-2006); chief of Plans, 3rd ACR (2004-2005); observer/controller (Grizzly Team) at the Combat Maneuver Training Center in Hohenfels, Germany (2001-2003); assistant S3 and later company commander for Company B, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, Fort Hood (1999-2001), operations officer, G3 (Force Modernization) III Corps and Fort Hood (1998); tank platoon leader, scout platoon leader, company executive officer, and assistant S-3 for 1st Squadron, 3rd ACR, at Fort Bliss, Texas (1994-1995) and later at Fort Carson (1996-1997).

    Simmering’s military education includes the Armor Officer Basic Course and Armor Officer Advanced Course (Fort Knox, Kentucky), Command and General Staff College (2004) and the Joint Advanced Warfighting School, National Defense University (2014). He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering Management from the United States Military Academy as well as Master’s degrees from Kansas State University and the National Defense University.

    Simmering’s awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit (one oak leaf cluster), Bronze Star (one oak leaf cluster), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), the Parachutist’s Badge, Air Assault Badge, and the Combat Action Badge.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Samuel C. Rapp

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Samuel C. Rapp, a native of Choctaw, Oklahoma, entered the Army in August 1994.

    Rapp completed M1 Abrams Armor Crewman One Station Unit Training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, and has been assigned to 2nd Battalion, 37th Armor Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, and 2nd Battalion, 63rd Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, in Vilseck, Germany; 1st Squadron, 12th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas; 2nd Battalion, 37th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Friedberg, Germany; 7th Army Noncommissioned Officers’ Academy, Grafenwoehr, Germany; 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Georgia; operations sergeant major for the 5th Squadron, 15th Cavalry Regiment, 194th Armored Brigade, at Fort Benning, Georgia; and as the command sergeant major for 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division at Fort Wainwright, Alaska.

    His operational deployments include one in support of Operation Able Sentry in Macedonia, one in support of the stabilization force in Bosnia-Herzegovinia, one in support of Joint Task Force East Romania, two in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and one in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Afghanistan.

    He has served in every non-commissioned officer leadership position from tank gunner to command sergeant major. His military education includes all courses in the Noncommissioned Officer Education System realm, culminating with Class 63 of the Sergeants Major Course; Battle Staff NCO Course, Small Group Instructor Training Course, Total Army Instructor Training Course, Master Fitness Trainer Course, and Modern Army Combatives Level I and II.

    Rapp's awards and decorations include: the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with Valor Device, Army Achievement Medal, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, GWOT Service Medal, Afghanistan Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon, Combat Action Badge and German Marksmanship Badge (Schutzenschnur-Gold). He is a member of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club, honorary member of the Sergeant Morales Club, Draper Armor Leadership Awardee, and recipient of the Order of Saint George Bronze Medallion.

  • Unit History

    The 3rd Brigade was constituted Nov. 19, 1917, in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 8th Infantry Brigade, as an element of the 4th Infantry Division. It was organized in December 1917 at Camp Greene, N.C. The Brigade has been reorganized and redesignated several times over the years. Finally, on Dec. 15, 1970, it was activated at Fort Carson, Colo., as 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division.

    When the Division Headquarters moved to Fort Hood, Texas in 1995, the brigade remained at Fort Carson and was redesignated as the 3rd Brigade Combat Team (3rd BCT). In May 2006 the brigade completed its transformation to the Army's modular design.

    The brigade has received numerous campaign participation credits, including Aisne-Marne and Meuse-Argonne During World War I; Counteroffensive, Phases II-VI, and Tet Counteroffensive in Vietnam; and Operation Iraqi Freedom I of the War on Terrorism to name a few. A few of its more prestigious decorations include the Presidential Unit Citation, the Valorous Unit Award, the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, and the Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class.

    The 3rd Brigade Combat Team is comprised of nearly 3,800 Soldiers including: 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment; the 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment; the 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment; the 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment; the 3rd Special Troops Battalion; and 64th Brigade Support Battalion.

    The 3rd BCT has deployed four times in a span of seven years in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; from 2003-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008 and later, Operation New Dawn from 2010-2011. In Iraq, the brigade's mission included several key areas: neutralizing the anti-Iraqi forces, building a capable Iraqi Security Force, legitimizing a responsive government, and putting Iraqis in the lead. During the latter half of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the beginning of Operation New Dawn, from March 2010-2011, the 3rd BCT had the mission to serve as an advise and assist brigade responsible for advising, training, and assisting Iraqi Security Forces. During that deployment, they provided training and assistance to Iraqi security forces, while simultaneously assisting the Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT) in helping the Iraqi government rebuild its civil capacity and infrastructure. While there, the brigade fell under the command of the 1st Infantry Division and the 36th Infantry Division in the southern four provinces of Iraq.

    Along with its organic elements, the brigade partnered with two Iraqi Army Divisions, 10th IA Division and 14th IA Division; 4th Region DBE with the 9th, 10th, and 14th Brigades; three ports of entry one each at Safwan, Al Sheeb, and Shalamcheh; one Federal Police Brigade; the Iraqi Highway Police in Dhi Qar Province; and Iraqi police with four separate provincial directors of police. The brigade also partnered with four PRT, responsible for securing movement, assessing projects and managing commanders' emergency response funds.

    The brigade's units worked with their partners diligently; training, mentoring and providing enablers when needed to assist the Iraqis to develop an effective and lethal security force capable of defeating the anti-Iraqi forces and supporting the elected government. The 3rd BCT returned to Fort Carson in March 2011.

    The 3rd BCT sent more than 300 of its officers and senior noncommissioned officers in April and May of 2012, on a nine-month deployment to the southern provinces of Afghanistan to help mentor and train current Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF). While supporting their deployed leadership, the remaining “Iron Brigade” Soldiers, NCO's and officers continue to train and prepare to maintain combat readiness to fulfill any future mission requirements.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

4th Combat Aviation Brigade (4CAB)

  • Col. W. Scott Gallaway, Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. W. Scott Gallaway assumed command of 4th Combat Aviation Brigade July 21, 2017. He is a native of Bernardsville, New Jersey, and received his commission from the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at Rutgers University in 1996. Over the past 21 years, Gallaway has served in a variety of tactical and strategic assignments to include four combat deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq and two overseas postings to Kuwait and South Korea. He has deployed as an Apache helicopter platoon leader (Kuwait), Apache helicopter company commander (Afghanistan), aviation task force operations officer (Iraq), aviation brigade operations officer (Afghanistan), and most recently as an aviation battalion task force commander (Afghanistan). Other key assignments include strategist in Army War Plans, assistant executive officer to the Army G-3/5/7, and special assistant to the Army’s chief of staff. In lieu of the senior service college, Gallaway was selected for the Army’s Strategic Planning and Policy Program (ASP3).

    Gallaway holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Rutgers University, a Master’s degree in Joint Planning from the Army’s Command and General Staff College, and a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is currently pursuing a PhD in International Studies from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver.

    His military awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (five oak leaf clusters), Air Medal, Combat Action Badge, Senior Army Aviator Badge, Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, and the Order of Saint Michael (Bronze).

  • Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jimmie Brooks, Brigade Chief Warrant Officer

    Biography

    Chief Warrant Officer 5 Jimmie Brooks enlisted the U.S. Army in October 1989. He attended Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training as a light wheeled vehicle mechanic at Fort Dix, New Jersey, with his first duty station being with the 3rd Explosive Ordnance Detachment located in Augsburg, Germany. In December 1990 he deployed in support of operations Desert Shield, Storm and Saber.

    After returning from deployment, he was selected to attend Warrant Officer Candidate School and Flight School. From November 1991 through April 1992 he was assigned to the 10th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH), located at Fort Carson. From April 1992 through June 1993, Brooks attended Warrant Officer Candidate School and Flight School learning to fly in the UH-1 Huey and then transitioning into the OH-58A/C Scout helicopter. In August 1999, Brooks transitioned again to the AH-64 Apache helicopter in which he is still current and qualified in to date.

    His military education courses include the Warrant Officer Basic Course , Warrant Officer Staff and Senior Staff Courses, Instructor Pilot, Instrument Flight Examiner, Master Gunner, Aviation Mission Survivability Officer and Aviation Material Officers Course.

    Brooks’ deployments include: Operations Desert Shield/Storm/Saber (December 1990 to June 1991); Operation Iraqi Freedom, Al Asad Air Base (April 2003 to April 2004); OIF 07-09, Baghdad (July 2008 to February 2009); Operation New Dawn, Talil, Iraq, (February 2011 to December 2011) and Operation Enduring Freedom, Kandahar, Afghanistan (March 2014 to November 2014).

    His awards include Bronze Star Medals, Meritorious Service Medals, Air Medals, Army Commendation Medals, Army Achievement Medal and the Good Conduct Medal.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Marty H. Book

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Marty H. Book, a native of Port Royal, Pennsylvania, entered the Army in June 1988 and attended Basic Training at Fort Dix, New Jersey, and Advance Individual Training at Fort Rucker, Alabama.

    He has served the Army as a tactical (UH-60) and utility (UH-1) helicopter repairer, technical inspector, flight instructor, AIT instructor, recruiter, platoon sergeant, forward operating base mayor, first sergeant, battalion command sergeant major, and brigade operations sergeant major. His assignments include: 507th Medical Company AA, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Company B, 1st Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, South Korea; Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Bn., 24th Avn. Reg., Fort Stewart, Georgia; Company A 2nd Bn., 2nd Aviation Regiment, South Korea; Company K, 159th Avn. Reg., Fort Stewart; Blue Ribbon Recruiting Bn., Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Company A, 602nd ASB, South Korea; 1st Staff and Faculty USAALS, Fort Eustis, Virginia.; Company B, 1st Bn., 222nd Avn. Reg., Fort Eustis; Company A, 501st Avn. Reg., Germany; Company D, 2nd Bn., 501st Avn. Reg., Germany; Company D, 2nd Bn., 159th AHB, Germany; HHC 5th Bn., 101st Avn. Reg., Fort Campbell, Kentucky; 2nd Bn., 158th AHB, Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington; 1st Aviation Brigade, Fort Rucker, Alabama. Book has been deployed in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.

    Book has attended all levels of the Noncommissioned Officers Education System, culminating with the United States Sergeants Major Academy class 62. He graduated from Juniata High School in Pennsylvania, earned his Bachelors of Science in Professional Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida and received his Master in Business Administration (MBA) from Excelsior College in New York.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (two oak leaf clusters), Meritorious Service Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Air Medal, Army Commendation Medal (one silver oak leaf cluster), Army Achievement Medal (four oak leaf clusters), Valorous Unit Citation Ribbon (one oak leaf cluster), Army Superior Unit Award, Good conduct Medal (ninth award), National Defense Service Medal (second Award), Korean Defensive Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon (with numeral 4), Overseas Service Ribbon (with numeral 5), Military Volunteerism Service Medal and NATO Medal and is a member of the Order of St Michael. He has additionally earned the Master Aviation, Air Assault, Recruiter, and Drivers badges.

  • Unit History

    The "Ivy Eagles" were first activated as the 4th Aviation Company, 4th Infantry Division, at Fort Lewis, Washington, April 1, 1957. It was then reorganized and redesignated Oct. 1, 1963, as the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Aviation Battalion.

    The 4th Aviation Battalion deployed to the Republic of Vietnam in September 1966, where it participated in multiple campaigns and was awarded two Republic of Vietnam Crosses of Gallantry and one Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal. The unit redeployed to the U.S. in 1970 where it was inactivated at Fort Lewis, Washington, Dec. 4, 1970.

    The 4th Aviation Battalion was activated at Fort Carson, Colorado, and redesignated the Aviation Company, 4th Inf. Div., Nov. 21, 1972. It was again reorganized and redesignated March 17, 1980, as HHC, 4th Aviation Battalion, and again Aug. 16, 1987, as 4th Aviation. In 1995, the unit relocated to Fort Hood, Texas, with the 4th Inf. Div. On Oct. 1, 2005, the unit was redesignated as the 4th Aviation Regiment.

    The 4th Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Inf. Div., deployed in 2005 and 2008 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and was awarded two Meritorious Unit Citations. The unit's most recent deployment was in 2010 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, after which 4th CAB was awarded a Valorous Unit Award. Task Force Iron Eagle supported 22 allied nations across four Regional Commands, the largest geographical area of any combat aviation brigade.

    The 4th CAB, 4th Inf. Div., was inactivated at Fort Hood, Texas, September 2011. The 4th CAB HHC was reactivated July 2, 2013, at Fort Carson, Colorado.

    The 2nd General Support Aviation Battalion, 4th Avn. Reg., 4th CAB, was the first battalion to reactivate at Fort Carson, Colorado, in April 2013. In May 2014, the remaining four battalions that comprise the 4th CAB now were activated. They are the 6th Attack Reconnaissance Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment; 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 4th Avn. Reg.; 4th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 4th Avn. Reg.; and 404th Aviation Support Battalion.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

Division Artillery

  • Col. Norberto Menéndez, DIVARTY Commander

    Biography

    Col. Norberto Menéndez was commissioned a lieutenant of Field Artillery and earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science upon graduation as a distinguished military graduate from Florida International University in 1997. He also holds Masters of Arts degrees in National Security and Strategic Studies from the United States Naval War College and the United States Army War College. Military education includes Field Artillery Officer Basic Course, Cavalry Leader’s Course, Infantry Captains Career Course (ICCC), and the College of Naval Command and Staff.

    Menéndez’s first assignment was in 3rd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division DIVARTY at Fort Hood, Texas, where he deployed in support of Operation Joint Forge to Bosnia-Herzegovina. After completion of the ICCC in 2001, Menéndez was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Upon arrival to the 82d, he reported to 3rd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, where he served as a task force fire support officer for 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, battalion assistant operations officer, and commander of Battery A (105mm Towed). Menéndez was then assigned to the 82nd ABN DIVARTY Headquarters to command Headquarters and Headquarters Battery. Upon completion of command, he served as aide-de-camp to the commanding general, 82nd Airborne Division. While assigned to the 82nd ABN DIV, Menéndez deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan twice (January-August 2003 and January 2007 to April 2008). After completion of assignment to the 82nd ABN DIV, Menéndez studied at the Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, Rhode Island, and immediately after graduation from NWC he was assigned the 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division at Fort Carson, where he assumed duties as operations officer for 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment, in July 2009. In December 2009, he was reassigned as executive officer for 4th Squadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment, and deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn from March 2010 to March 2011. From August 2011 to July 2013, Menéndez served at NATO Headquarters Allied Force Command – Madrid, in Madrid, Spain, as a land component planner. In August 2013, he assumed command of 1st Battalion, 37th Field Artillery Regiment, 7th Infantry Division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. After command, he studied at the U.S. Army War College from July 2015 to June 2016. Menéndez’s most recent assignment was as G3 for the 3rd Infantry Division.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (with five oak leaf clusters), Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Combat Action Badge, and the Master Parachutist Badge.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Benito A Perez Jr.

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Benito A Perez Jr. was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and entered the National Guard in Los Angeles, California, July 14, 1989, and attended One Station Unit Training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, graduating as a 13B mechanical crewman in the Field Artillery. Perez joined the regular Army Feb. 7, 1990.

    Perez has served in a variety of assignments, which include; advance party, Battery A, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Campbell, Kentucky; ammo team chief, Battery C, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, Kirch Goens, Germany; Howitzer Gunner, Battery A, 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery, Fort Carson; Howitzer section chief, Battery A, 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Benning, Georgia; Battery A, 1st Battalion, 15th Field Artillery Regiment, Camp Casey, Korea; drill sergeant, Battery D, 1st Battalion, 19thField Artillery Regiment; Battery B, 1st Battalion, 40th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; platoon sergeant, Battery C, 3rdBattalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas; senior instructor writer, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 30th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; first sergeant, Battery E, 1st Battalion, 22nd Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; senior enlisted advisor for the 3rd Division Military Transition Team, Fort Riley, Kansas; battalion operation sergeant major, 2nd Battalion, 5th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill; brigade operation sergeant major, 214 Fires Brigade, Fort Sill; senior enlisted advisor for the 4th Iraq Army Division Military Transition Team, Fort Polk, Louisiana; operation sergeant major, 7thSquadron, 10th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Carson; command sergeant major, 3rd Battalion 16th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Carson; command sergeant major, 2nd Brigade ABCT 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson; command sergeant major, 1st Battalion, 290th Field Artillery Regiment; and command sergeant major, Camp Atterbury, Indiana. Also, Perez previously served in five campaigns: Operation Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom 1 and 5, Operation New Dawn and Operation Spartan Shield.

    Perez’s military education includes the Primary Leadership Development Course, the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course, the Advanced Non-Commissioned Officer Course, First Sergeant Course, the United States Sergeants Major Academy (class 59), Drill Sergeant School, and Air Assault School. Perez received a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Psychology from Park University.

    His awards and decorations include; The Bronze Star (with oak leaf cluster), Meritorious Service Medal (with four oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (With V device, and silver oak leaf cluster), Army Achievement Medal (with two oak leaf clusters), Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, Driver Badge, Air Assault Badge, Combat Action Badge, The Honorable Order of Saint Barbara and The Order of Saint Maurice.

  • Unit History

    The unit was first constituted Nov. 19, 1917, as Headquarters Battery, 4th Field Artillery Brigade, and assigned to the 4th Infantry Division. The unit was organized for combat operations at Camp Greene, North Carolina, from Dec. 15, 1917, to January 10, 1918. 4th Field Artillery Brigade departed for World War I in Europe in the winter of 1918.

    Upon returning stateside, the 4th Field Artillery Brigade was stationed at Camp Lewis, Washington, where it was inactivated Sept. 21, 1921. 4th Field Artillery Brigade was redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Field Artillery Brigade at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Jan. 1, 1935, and then disbanded Nov. 14, 1939. Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Field Artillery was reconstituted Sept. 10, 1940, as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery (DIVARTY). Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery, was activated Oct. 1, 1940, at Fort Benning, Georgia, and participated in multiple World War II campaigns. The unit was inactivated March 5, 1946, at Camp Butler, North Carolina. On July 6, 1948, at Fort Ord, California, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery, was again activated.

    April 1, 1957, at Fort Lewis, Washington, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Division Artillery, was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Infantry DIVARTY. By December 1970, the unit returned from South Vietnam to Fort Carson, Colorado. During that same year, the unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Infantry Division Artillery (Mechanized). This last redesignation named the Division Artillery the "Iron Gunners," which complemented the "Ironhorse" Division. With the realignment and downsizing of the Army force, the unit was reassigned to Fort Hood, Texas, Dec. 15, 1995. On Dec. 16, 2004, the transformation and restructuring of the 4th Infantry Division Artillery marked the Army's first modular fires brigade. The brigade then inactivated April 16, 2007, at Fort Hood, Texas, because of the realignment of Army units. On May 6, 2015, the unit was redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 4th Infantry Division Artillery, at Fort Carson, Colorado, and unfurled its colors on Founders Field May 14.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

4th Sustainment Brigade (4SB)

  • Col. Geoffrey Kent, Brigade Commander

    Biography

    Col. Geoffrey Kent assumed command of the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, July 25, 2017, after graduating from the National Defense University and completing consecutive command tours at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He commanded the 782nd Brigade Support Battalion for the 4th Brigade Combat Team and 82nd Airborne Division and also the support squadron for 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment (Delta). He possesses a wide range of conventional and nonconventional experience deploying numerous times worldwide, where he’s gained significant joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational experience.

    Kent grew up in the National Capital Region and headed south to earn his bachelor’s degree and ROTC commission from the University of Alabama. He holds two master’s degrees -- one in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College and another in National Resource Strategy from the Eisenhower School at National Defense University. In addition, he’s earned his certificate in the Advanced Program in Logistics and Technology from the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School.

    Kent served in several challenging joint, SOF and conventional assignments over the course of 23 years in support of sensitive missions and major operations. These include operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and Inherent Resolve and MIA recovery missions in Vietnam, Laos, North Korea and China (Tibet). His key command and staff positions include: headquarters and supply company commander for the 801st Main Support Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) at Fort Campbell, Kentucky; MIA recovery team commander with the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii; supply and support operations officer for Task Force 1-160th & regiment/brigade supply officer (S4) for the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment at Fort Campbell; Task Force 3-73 J4 at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan; aide de camp to the commanding general, Installation Management Command (IMCOM); staff officer with Joint Staff J5, Pakistan Afghanistan Coordination Cell (PACC); and executive officer to the deputy commander for support at U.S. Forces Command - Afghanistan (USFOR-A) in Kabul.

    Kent is a graduate of the Airborne, Air Assault, and Jumpmaster Courses. In addition, he’s a graduate of the Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE - Level C High Risk) course. His military decorations include the Bronze Star (one oak leaf cluster), the Defense Meritorious Service Medal (one oak leaf cluster) and the Meritorious Service Medal (three oak leaf clusters). He is authorized to wear the Combat Action Badge, the Senior Parachutist Badge, the Air Assault Badge, the Rigger Badge and both the French and British Parachutist Wings. He is also recognized as a distinguished member of the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Phelicea Redd

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Phelicea Redd is a native of Memphis, Tennessee. She entered the Army in August 1996 and attended Basic Training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Lee, Virginia, where she was awarded the primary military occupational specialty 92A, automated logistical specialist. Redd has held a myriad leadership positions to include S-4 NCO, warehouse NCO in charge, operations sergeant, division aviation logistics NCO, platoon sergeant, theater procurement NCO in charge, materiel management NCO, senior drill sergeant, first sergeant and battalion command sergeant major.

    Her previous assignments include 2nd Infantry Division, 7th Infantry Division, 10th Mountain Division, 101st Airborne Division and Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

    Redd's military education includes all levels of the NCO Professional Development System, Drill Sergeant Course, Basic Instructor Training Course, Battle Staff, Support Operations Course Phase II, Combatives I, Contracting Officer Representative Course, Master Fitness Training Course, Master Resilience Training Course, Maintenance Leader's Course, and several other functional courses.

    Her military awards and decorations include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (three oak leaf clusters), Army Commendation Medal (one oak leaf cluster), Army Achievement Medal (three oak leaf clusters), Army Good Conduct Medal (seventh award), National Defense Service Ribbon, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary and Service Medals, NCO Professional Development Ribbon (Numeral 5), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (Numeral 3), NATO International Security Assistance Force Medal, Drill Sergeant Identification Badge and the Driver's Badge.

    She has a bachelor's degree in leadership and organizational administration from Austin Peay State University. Redd has certifications as a Green Belt in Lean Six Sigma and a Demonstrated Senior Logistician. She is a distinguished member of the Quartermaster Corps; the recipient of the Staff Sgt. John W. Kreckel Leadership Award, the Distinguished Order of St. Martin, the Order of St. Maurice and the Order of St. Barbara.

  • Unit Resources

  • 4SB Units


    Sponsorship



    Unit History

    The Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion of the 4th Infantry Division was constituted in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 4th Division, Nov. 19, 1917. It was organized Dec. 10, 1917, at Camp Greene, North Carolina. The unit was inactivated Sept. 21, 1921, at Camp Lewis, Washington, and reactivated June 1, 1940, at Fort Benning, Georgia.

    On July 26, 1967, acting on a seven-hour notification, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 43rd and 352nd Transportation Company (Light Truck) deployed to Selfridge Air Force Base, Michigan, to provide logistical support for the elements of the XVIII Airborne Corps during riot control operations. In August and September 1967, units of the Group deployed to Alaska during severe flooding to establish a field laundry site. In 1968, the organization of the Group changed: the 336th Ordnance Battalion joined the Group May 20 and the 242nd Maintenance Battalion, one of the Group's original members, inactivated Aug. 25. In addition to Group organization changes, the 336th Ordnance Battalion deployed to Southeast Asia Sept. 26, 1968.

    On Aug. 1, 1942, the unit was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters, 4th Motorized Division. It was again reorganized and redesignated Aug. 4, 1943, as Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division. The unit was inactivated March 12, 1946, at Camp Butner, North Carolina, and reactivated July 15, 1947, at Fort Ord, California.

    HHBN was further reorganized and redesignated three more times. First, on June 13, 1960, as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Infantry Division; second, on Dec. 16, 2004, as Headquarters and Tactical Command Posts, 4th Infantry Division; and third, on May 16, 2009, as the Division Special Troops Battalion, 4th Infantry Division.

    Effective July 17, 2008, the 43rd Area Support Group was redesignated as the 43rd Sustainment Brigade. As part of the reorganization, the 43rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion and 230th Financial Management Company (FMCO) were activated and the 10th Combat Support Hospital and 4th Engineer Battalion were reassigned away from the Brigade.

    The 43rd was led by Col. Edward Daly into Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom XI. While deployed in Kandahar, the unit provided logistics to the United States forces operating in Regional Command-South and Regional Command-Southwest. They returned to Fort Carson in March 2011.

    The 43rd Sustainment Brigade was redesignated the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, effective July 9, 2015. As part of the reorganization, 4th Sustainment Brigade integrated fully into the overall 4th Infantry Division command at Fort Carson to continue the outstanding support for 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson Soldiers.

Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHBN)

  • Lt. Col. Christopher J. Morris, Battalion Commander

    Biography

    Lt. Col. Christopher J. Morris was born in Redbank, New Jersey. He received his commission from the United States Military Academy in 2000 where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science.

    Upon entering active duty as an Infantry officer, Morris was assigned to 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, at Fort Hood, Texas, where he served as a rifle platoon leader and a reconnaissance platoon leader. In 2006, upon completion of the Special Forces Qualification Course, Morris was assigned to 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne). During his tenure as a detachment commander, Morris commanded Operational Detachment – Alpha 3111 and 3136. Upon completion of his detachment command time, Morris served as the 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), assistant operations officer for special projects. In 2012, Morris earned a Master of Science degree in Defense Analysis — focus area in Irregular Warfare — from the Naval Postgraduate School. Upon completion of Naval Postgraduate School, Morris assumed command of Charlie Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne). Following command, he served as the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), operations and executive officer. In 2015 Morris was selected to join the Joint Special Operations Command as the deputy chief of current operations. In 2017, Morris earned a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School.

    His military education includes Air Assault School, Airborne School, Ranger School, Infantry Officer Basic Course, Infantry Officer Advanced Course, the Bradley Leaders Course, the Special Forces Operational Detachment Officer Course, the Advanced Special Operations Techniques Course and Naval War College Intermediate Level Education.

    His military awards include The Bronze Star Medal with valor device (2), the Bronze Star Medal (6), the Purple Heart, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal (2), the Joint Commendation Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal (4), the Army Achievement Medal (2), the Parachutists Badge, the Air Assault Badge, the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, the Expert Infantryman’s Badge, the Ranger Tab and the Special Forces Tab.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Rietta D. Owens

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Rietta D. Owens enlisted into the Army March 25, 1992, completing Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, graduating as an administrative specialist. She has served in several leadership positions from section sergeant to battalion command sergeant major in her 26 years of military service.

    Owens' various assignments and positions throughout her career include: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Aviation Brigade Fort Ord, California; 566th Adjutant General Company (Postal), Schweinfurt, Germany; 90th Postal Company, Wurzburg, Germany; Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 187th Medical Battalion, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; United States Army Garrison, Fort Myer, Virginia; 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, Fort Jackson; 3rd Infantry Division Inspector General Office, Fort Stewart, Georgia; Headquarters Battalion, Fort Belvoir, Virginia; White House Military Office, Washington, D.C.; Army Review Boards Agency, Arlington, Virginia; and III Corps and Fort Hood Inspector General Office, Fort Hood, Texas. Owens’ deployment experience includes: Operation Joint Endeavor, Bosnia-Herzegovina; Operation Support Hope, Entebbe, Uganda; and Operation Iraqi Freedom III/VI.

    Owens is a graduate of all Noncommissioned Officers’ Education System courses culminating with Class 62 of the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. Owens is also a graduate of the First Sergeants Course; Army Drill Sergeant Course and The Inspector General Course. Her civilian education includes a Bachelor of Arts in Management from Columbia College and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) and a Master of Human Resources Management from Webster University.

    Owens' awards and decorations include the Bronze Star (second award), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (fourth award), Army Commendation Medal (fourth award), Army Achievement Medal (eighth award), Army Good Conduct Medal (seventh award), National Defense Service Medal (second award), Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal (two bronze stars), Global War of Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, NCO Professional Development Ribbon (Numeral 4), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, NATO Medal, Joint Meritorious Unit Award (second award), Army Meritorious Unit Award, Presidential Service Badge, Army Staff Badge, and the Drill Sergeant Badge. She is also a member of the distinguished Sergeant Audie Murphy Club.

  • Unit Resources

  • Unit History

    The Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion of the 4th Infantry Division was constituted in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 4th Division, Nov. 19, 1917. It was organized Dec. 10, 1917, at Camp Greene, North Carolina. The unit was inactivated Sept. 21, 1921, at Camp Lewis, Washington, and re-activated June 1, 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia.

    On Aug. 1, 1942, the unit was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters, 4th Motorized Division. It was again reorganized and redesignated Aug. 4, 1943, as Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division. The unit was inactivated March 12, 1946, at Camp Butner, North Carolina, and reactivated July 15, 1947, at Fort Ord, California.

    HHBN was further reorganized and redesignated three more times. First, on June 13, 1960, as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Infantry Division; second, on Dec. 16, 2004, as Headquarters and Tactical Command Posts, 4th Infantry Division; and third, on May 16, 2009, as the Division Special Troops Battalion, 4th Infantry Division.

    The headquarters element of the 4th Infantry Division has participated in the following campaigns: Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne 1918 and Lorraine 1918 (WWI); Normandy (with arrowhead), Northern France, Rhinleand, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe (WWII); Counteroffensive Phase II, Counteroffensive Phase III, Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive Phase IV, Counteroffensive Phase V, Counteroffensive Phase VI, Tet 69/Counteroffensive, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter-Spring 1970, Sanctuary Counteroffensive and Counteroffensive Phase VII (Vietnam).

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

    Links

Family Readiness (FRG)

What is a family readiness group (FRG)?

An OFFICIAL command-sponsored organization of family members, volunteers and Soldiers belonging to a unit who together provide an avenue of SUPPORT and ASSISTANCE. FRGs act as a CONDUIT of INFORMATION and a COMMUNICATION LINE between the unit and the families. FRGs act as a CONDUIT of INFORMATION and a COMMUNICATION LINE between our Fort Carson community and the families.

Why should I connect with my family readiness group (FRG)?

  • Strong families make strong Soldiers! FRGs can empower families with accurate unit and community information.
  • Find out when your Soldier will be home and when your Soldier will be out in the field.
  • Be in the know about long weekends, vacation time and deployments.
  • Discover family benefits, discounts and opportunities that may be available to you and your children.
  • Information is Power. Your FRG wants to help empower YOU!

Visit your Soldier's unit homepage for more information. Click on the links on the left for 4th Infantry Division brigades or click here for tenant units. Click here for a list of unit staff duty phone numbers.

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