Mission

The 4th Engineer Battalion deploys, receives, integrates, and provides command and control of attached units in order to conduct full spectrum engineering operations in support of an Army, Joint, or Coalition Task Force.

Leadership

  • Battalion Commander Dick Lt. Col. Alexander L. Young, Battalion Commander

    Biography

    Lt. Col. Alexander L. Young was commissioned from the ROTC program at the University of Pennsylvania in 2002 where he studied Electrical Engineering, earning a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. He is a graduate of the United States Command and General Staff College and School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS) and earned a Masters in Military Arts and Science.

    Upon graduating the Engineer Officer Basic Course, Young deployed with the 94th Engineer Battalion as a platoon leader from Germany to Kuwait in March 2003 and through to Baghdad as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Later that year, he served with British forces in southern Iraq as the lead military engineer for essential services in the British area of operations.

    Young deployed again in 2005 with the 94th Eng. Bn. to Mosul, Iraq, serving as an assistant battalion operations officer attached to the 11th and 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiments. The assignment included planning engineer support for the 3rd ACR’s initial counterinsurgency operations and siege of Tal Afar in September 2005. He later served as a company executive officer for Headquarters and Support Company, 94th Eng. Bn.

    Upon graduation of the Engineer Captains Career Course, Young helped activate the 7th Engineer Battalion at Fort Drum, New York, in 2007, serving as the activating unit’s battalion S3 until taking command of the 642nd Engineer Company in 2008. He deployed the company in 2009 to southern Iraq as part of the Multi-National Division South. After changing command in Iraq, he served with the Department of State as a team leader for a Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) essential services team that planned and managed major infrastructure projects in Basra Province.

    Young next deployed in 2012 to Kabul, Afghanistan, to serve as a joint planner with the United States Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A) and NATO’s International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). Upon redeployment in 2013, he served as a battalion S3 and executive officer in the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, at Fort Riley, Kansas. He later served as the Secretary of the General Staff for the 1st Infantry Division.

    Young most recently served as the deputy commanding officer for the 130th Engineer Brigade in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (one oak leaf cluster), the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal (two oak leaf clusters), the Army Commendation Medal (one oak leaf cluster), and the Combat Action Badge. He is Airborne qualified and was awarded the Bronze Order of the de Fleury Medal.

  • Battalion Command Sergeant Major Ferguson Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Miller

    Biography

    Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Miller was formerly a student at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy, Class 68, at Fort Bliss, Texas. Miller has held every enlisted leadership position during his career, ranging from team leader to command sergeant major.

    A native of Kearny, Arizona, Miller enlisted in the Army in 2000 and attended Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, as a 12B (combat engineer). In addition to his tours in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Inherent Resolve, Miller was also stationed overseas at Camp Howze, South Korea; Baumholder, Germany; and various special operations deployments. During his career, Miller has served with the 10th Mountain Division (Light), 2nd Infantry Division, 1st Engineer Brigade, 1st Armor Division, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta and the Joint Special Operations Command. Miller’s training and educational levels include all noncommissioned officer professional development courses culminating with the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. He also maintains a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Leadership from Trident University International.

    Miller’s awards include the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Defense Meritorious Service Medal (second award), Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal with Valor, Army Commendation Medal (fifth award), Iraqi Campaign Medal (four bronze stars), Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (second award), Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (fifth award), Sapper Tab, Combat Action Badge, Airborne Badge and Air Assault Badge. He is also the recipient of the Bronze De Fleury Medal from the Engineer Regiment.

  • Unit Resources

  • Unit History

    Organized 31 December 1861 in the Regular Army at Washington, D.C., from new and existing companies of engineers as a provisional engineer battalion (constituted 28 July 1866 as the Battalion of Engineers). Expanded 14 March-7 June 1901 to form the 1st and 2nd Battalions of Engineers (1st Battalion of Engineers-hereafter separate lineage). 2nd Battalion of Engineers expanded, reorganized, and redesignated 1 July-1 August 1916 as the 2nd Regiment of Engineers. 2nd Regiment of Engineers expanded 21 May-20 June 1917 to form the 2nd, 4th, and 5th Regiments of Engineers (2nd and 5th Regiments of Engineers-hereafter separate lineages). 4th Regiment of Engineers redesignated 29 August 1917 as the 4th Engineers. Assigned 1 January1918 to the 4th Division. Inactivated 21 September 1921 at Camp Lewis, Washington. Company A activated 24 July 1922 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Relieved 15 August 1927 from assignment to the 4th Division and assigned to the 6th Division (Company A inactivated 30 September 1929). Relieved 1 October 1933 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 4th Division (later redesignated as the 4th Infantry Division) (Company A concurrently activated at Fort Benning, Georgia). Redesignated 19 October 1939 as the 4th Engineer Battalion. Activated (less Company A) 1 June 1940 at Fort Benning. Georgia. Reorganized and redesignated 19 September1942 as the 4th Engineer Motorized 8attalion. Reorganized and redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 4th Engineer Combat Battalion. Inactivated 19 February 1946 at Camp Butner, North Carolina. Activated 6 July 1948 at Fort Ord, California. Redesignated 5 June 1953 as the 4th Engineer Battalion. Inactivated 15 December 2004 at Fort Carson, Colorado, and relieved from assignment to the 4th Infantry Division. Headquarters and Headquarters Company activated 18 October 2006 at Fort Carson. CO to the present time.

    Campaigns

    The Civil War

    • Peninsula
    • Antietam
    • Fredericksburg
    • Chancellorsville
    • Wilderness
    • Spotsylvania
    • Cold Harbor
    • Petersburg
    • Appomattox
    • Virginia 1863
    War with Spain
    • Santiago
    Philippine Insurrection
    • Streamer without Inscription
    World War I
    • Aisne-Marne
    • St. Mihiel
    • Meuse-Argonne
    • Champagne 1918
    • Lorraine 1918
    World War II
    • Normandy (with arrowhead)
    • Northern France
    • Rhineland
    • Ardennes-Alsace
    • Central Europe
    Vietnam
    • Counteroffensive, Phase II
    • Counteroffensive, Phase III
    • Tet Counteroffensive
    • Counteroffensive, Phase IV
    • Counteroffensive, Phase V
    • Counteroffensive, Phase VI
    • Tet 69 / Counteroffensive
    • Summer-Fall 1969
    • Winter-Spring 1970
    • Sanctuary Counteroffensive
    • Counteroffensive, Phase VII
    War on Terrorism
    • Operation Iraqi Freedom
    • Liberation of Iraq
    • Transition of Iraq
    • Iraqi Sovereignty
    • Operation Enduring Freedom
    • Consolidation II
    • Consolidation III
    • Transition I

    Decorations

    • Belgian Fourragere 1940
    • Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in Belgium
    • Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in the Ardennes
    • Hurtgen Forest 1944
    • Presidential Unit Citation
    • Vietnam 1966-1969
    • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm
    • Vietnam 1967-1968
    • Meritorious Unit Commendation
    • Vietnam 1969-1970
    • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm
    • Vietnam 1966-1969
    • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class
    • Alpha Company entitled to:
    • Presidential Unit Citation for Pleiku Province, Dak To District
    • Charlie Company entitled to:
    • Valorous Unit Award for Quang Ngai Province
    • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm
    • Iraq 2003-2004
    • Valorous Unit Award
    • Afghanistan 2009-2010
    • Valorous Unit Award

    4th Engineer Battalion Distinctive Unit Insignia

    Description/Blazon

    A Gold metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules a fess wavy Argent; on a canton Or an anchor debruised by two oars in saltire of the field. Attached below the shield is a Gold scroll inscribed "VOLENS ET POTENS" in Red letters.

    Symbolism

    Scarlet and white are the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The wavy fess alludes to the outstanding feat accomplished by the organization in World War I, in which the regiment bridged the Vesle under heavy fire, making possible the forcing of the passage by the Division. The yellow canton, representative of the color of the Engineers' facing when the old companies of the regiment were organized in 1861, refers to the 2d Engineers, from which the 4th Engineers was organized in 1916. The device on the canton was the badge of the Engineers and Pontoniers of the Civil War.

    Background

    The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 4th Regiment Engineers on 18 February 1927. It was redesignated for the 4th Engineer Battalion on 5 December 1940.

    4th Engineer Battalion Coat of Arms

    Description/Blazon

    Shield
    Gules, a fess wavy Argent, on a canton Or an anchor debruised by two oars in saltire of the field. Crest
    From a wreath Argent and Gules a dexter cubit arm mailed Proper grasping four arrows Gules armed and feathered Argent. Motto
    VOLENS ET POTENS (Willing and Able).

    Symbolism

    Shield Scarlet and white are the colors of the Corps of Engineers. The wavy fess alludes to the outstanding feat accomplished by the organization in World War I, in which the regiment bridged the Vesle under heavy fire, making possible the forcing of the passage by the Division. The yellow canton, representative of the color of the Engineers' facing when the old companies of the regiment were organized in 1861, refers to the 2d Engineers, from which the 4th Engineers was organized in 1916. The device on the canton was the badge of the Engineers and Pontoniers of the Civil War. Crest The mailed hand and arrows are indicative of the combat capabilities of the unit, the number of arrows corresponding to the numerical designation of the battalion.

    Background
    The coat of arms was originally approved for the 4th Engineers on 21 January 1921. It was redesignated for the 4th Engineer Battalion on 4 December 1940.
  • Units

    Headquarters and Headquarters Company

    Headquarters and Headquarters Company deploys, receives, integrates, and provides command and control of 4th Engineer Battalion units in order to conduct full spectrum engineer operations in support of the 4th Engineer Battalion, Joint, and Coalition Task Force units.

    Forward Support Company

    Forward Support Company deploys in order to provide sustainment support to the 4th Engineer Battalion through full spectrum combat operations.

    41st Engineer Company (Route Clearance) Fort Riley, KS

    On order, the 41st Engineer Company (RCC) rapidly deploys world-wide in order to conduct route reconnaissance and clearance operations in support of Army, Joint and Combined Arms contingency operations.

    62nd Engineer Company (Sapper)

    The 62nd Engineer Company deploys in order to provide mobility and counter-mobility support to maneuver forces.

    569th Engineer Company (Mobility Augmentation)

    To provide command and control of engineer platoons that conduct Mobility, Counter-mobility and Survivability Operations in support of Full Spectrum Operations.

    576th Engineer Company (Route Clearance)

    The 576th Engineer Company deploys to conduct route and area clearance operations in support of Army, Joint, or Coalition Forces.

    615th Engineer Construction Company

    On Order, the 615th Engineer Construction Company provides trained and lethal platoons and squads capable of providing mobility, survivability, and construction support to maneuver forces and major combatant commands.

  • Sponsorship Information

    Housing Information

    Single Soldier Housing Office: 719-526-9709

    The Single Soldier Housing Office (SSHO) is located in building 1454 on Nelson Boulevard. The Directorate of Public Works (DPW) Housing Division manages the SSHO. Unit leaders continue to lead Soldiers who live in the barracks. Unit leaders continue to be responsible for good order and discipline. The SSHO augments unit leaders by managing the barracks. Single Soldiers and unit leaders should contact the SSHO with questions associated with the barracks and call the SSHO to submit service requests for room repairs.

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